KING OF SOULS (Nico & Ari Duet #2) VERONA LEGACY by L.A. Cotton

‘I didn’t want to be Arianne’s prince. I wanted to be her king. The king of her heart. The king of her soul.’

Without question, the love story between Nicco and Ari was straight out a mafia version of a Romeo & Juliet type romance. Both suffering from the forced inability to be together. Family wars, criminal wrongdoings, violence and the sins of the fathers. It’s all there with love as the shining beacon.

Read more here:
KING OF SOULS (Nico & Ari Duet #2) VERONA LEGACY by L.A. Cotton

Interview with Cat Hickey, Author of The Bellhop Only Stalks Once

What can you tell us about your new release, The Bellhop Only Stalks Once?

It’s a psychological thriller, in the vein of Janet Evanovich or Liane Moriarty in that it is not only suspenseful, but also has a sense of humor and very real, flawed characters who do the best they can in very strange situations. The main character is Chloe, who is just a typical Baltimore girl, but she finds herself involved in some serious criminal activity while on vacation in Costa Rica. She has no idea what’s going on at first, but the deeper in she gets the more she starts to figure things out, and she discovers quite a bit about herself along the way.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

There are too many authors to list here, I think! I started writing just after I read Watership Down for the first time, when I was just a little kid. Our family dog was the main character, and in the story her adventures took her to Tibet for a while, so I guess I’ve always been drawn to far flung locations! More recently, I’d say I’m immensely inspired by Liane Moriarty’s sense of characterization, in that as a reader I really relate to her characters, and also to Lisa Jewell, who puts normal characters in really abnormal sorts of situations, and it’s just very compelling.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

That’s going to be a weird mix! I’d have to say The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien, The Talisman by Stephen King and Peter Straub, Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty, Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn, and In a Dark Dark Wood by Ruth Ware.

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask

I think I’d want Leo Tolstoy (you didn’t give me any limitations, so 19th century Russian writers are fair game!) The dark way he views the human psyche has always intrigued me, and I wonder which life experiences made him feel that way about people.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

I love that moment when a new idea first strikes me, and I get down to outlining the book and it’s so full of possibilities and excitement. It’s absolutely the most fun part for me.

What is a typical day like for you?

I wish I could say that I wake up, drink a mimosa by the pool, then contemplate story ideas whilst lounging in a cabana. Wouldn’t that be great? But I teach at a university, and my class has gone online for the moment, so most days involve me running around my house like a crazy person, trying to answer emails, tripping over cats who want second breakfast, recording lectures for my students while trying to avoid being photobombed by said cats. If I can get all that finished, then I might get a few moments to get some writing done later on. It’s really not a glamorous sort of life at all.

What scene from The Bellhop Only Stalks Once was your favorite to write?

Without giving too much away, there’s a scene where one of the characters whacks somebody over the head with a kombucha bottle. It’s a scary scene, with a lot of danger, but I loved the incongruity of having the kombucha bottle used as a weapon, when it’s the drink of choice of peace-loving yogis and health conscious people.

Do you have a motto, quote, or philosophy you live by?

I do! It’s from Dune, which I read as a kid, and this quote really stuck with me throughout my life. It’s “I shall not fear. Fear is the mind killer.” It helps me get myself together whenever I’m about to do something that scares me.

Cat Hickey is the author of the new book The Bellhop Only Stalks Once.

Connect with Cat
Author Site
Facebook

Buy The Book
B08953192N cover image

Buy The Book

Sign up for our email and we’ll send you the best new books in your favorite genres weekly.

The post Interview with Cat Hickey, Author of The Bellhop Only Stalks Once appeared first on NewInBooks.

Interview with Gianna Gabriela, Author of Waiting For You

What can you tell us about your new release, Waiting For You?

Waiting For You is book 5 in the Bragan University Series. It’s a football romance that can can be read as a standalone. This book, this book took a piece of my heart when writing it. You’ll laugh, roll your eyes, and cry while reading it.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

I was inspired by the lack of representation in novels. I could never picture myself in the heroines so I wanted to write stories I could identify with.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

My top five books are Silence by Natasha Preston, The Pepper Series by Ali Dean, To All The Boys by Jenny H., Wuthering Heights by Emily B., and Anti Stepbrother by Tijan.

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask

Honestly, I’d invite Tijan and ask if I’m going to see Caden again!

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

My favorite thing about writing is getting lost. I don’t have a map but let the characters guide me. I love discovering where we’re going as we’re on our way.

What is a typical day like for you?

Well, right now I’m studying for the Bar Exam so I can finally be a lawyer. So a typical day involves seven hours of studying then watching TV.

What scene from Waiting For You was your favorite to write?

A breakdown scene. A moment that was not expected but that perfectly captures the emotions that go unnoticed or unseen in books. You’ll know it when you see it.

Do you have a motto, quote, or philosophy you live by?

I do, it’s the following: You have to do what you have to do in order to do what you want to do.

Gianna Gabriela is the author of the new book Waiting For You.

Connect with Gianna
Author Site
Facebook

Buy The Book
B08249DXB3 cover image

Buy The Book

Sign up for our email and we’ll send you the best new books in your favorite genres weekly.

The post Interview with Gianna Gabriela, Author of Waiting For You appeared first on NewInBooks.

Interview with Amelia Wilde, author of Richer Than God

What can you tell us about your new release, Richer Than God?

My new release Richer Than God is a dark, sexy romance with an unforgettable antihero! He’s the brother of the hero from my book King of Shadows, and things are only getting darker.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

I’ve always loved to read and write and when I found out it was possible to self-publish, I jumped in with both feet. My dad shared a lot of books with me when I was growing up and I just thought storytelling was the coolest dream career.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

It’s really hard to pick five books, but if I had to choose… My top five right in this moment would be American Queen by Sierra Simone, The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern, The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger, Feed by Mira Grant, and Code Name Verity by Elizabeth E. Wein.

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask?

If I could host a literary talk show I would invite Erin Morgenstern on and ask her how she wrote such a perfect book. I’m on a Night Circus kick lately—my husband and I just finished the audiobook and I’m still stuck on it.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

My favorite thing about writing is when I come up with something completely awesome for a character to say. Or when I leave my future self clues about characters’ true selves, and only come upon those clues when I’m re-reading.

What is a typical day like for you?

It depends on the season 😂 In the summer I like to get up early and go on a long walk. After that, I write while intermittently hanging out with my three daughters, and then we go out in the afternoon, and then in the evenings I write again and do other book work slash binge Netflix and play Nintendo Switch. In the winters, I find it impossible to get up early at all and going outside in northern Michigan is really hit or miss, so I usually don’t. Lots of writing at all times of year, though.

What scene in Richer Than God was your favorite to write?

My favorite scene in Richer Than God was this scene where the hero briefly leaves the heroine alone, thinks she might be gone, and goes to find her. It turns sexy (no surprises there) but first there’s this moment of worry on his part that opens the door to everything that follows. That one. That was my favorite one to write.

Do you have a motto, quote or philosophy you live by?

So, the book Code Name Verity is about this Air Transport Auxiliary pilot and a British spy in World War 2, and they’re both women, and they’re best friends. I can barely talk about this story without giving away a bunch of spoilers and/or crying, but obviously the pilot, Maddie, she learns to fly, and it’s the war, and she does this even though she’s scared to death. And no matter what happens, she just keeps telling herself—fly the plane. At one point she’s flying over occupied France, it’s dark, and the plane is broken. She’s probably going to have to crash-land it or bail out. But she just keeps flying. Fly the plane. That’s probably a weird motto, but I think of it every day.

Amelia Wilde is the author of the new book Richer Than God.

Connect with Amelia:
Author Website

 Twitter

Buy The Book
B088YWHP2K cover image

Buy The Book

Sign up for our email and we’ll send you the best new books in your favorite genres weekly.

The post Interview with Amelia Wilde, author of Richer Than God appeared first on NewInBooks.

The Story Behind The Island Daughter by Helena Halme

By Helena Halme

The story behind The Island Daughter is intertwined with my own life. Firstly, there is a family tragedy, mirroring the recent loss of my own father. Secondly, my mother lives in the beautiful Åland Islands, where the novel is set. I’ve spent countless holidays in this stunning archipelago between Finland and Sweden. In some way, I very much feel like the island daughter too!

The Island Daughter

A family tragedy forces Alicia to return to the islands where she was raised. She leaves behind a new life in Stockholm with a Swedish journalist, Patrick. But when Mia, his ex, and the only daughter of a local property magnate, makes a move to rekindle their relationship, Alicia is torn between duty and her own happiness. Alicia’s world is further upended when deeply buried family secrets surface. How can she face the future when everything she believed to be true about her past is a lie?

The Loss of A Father Figure

The relationship between Alicia and Patrick is central to the story, but the book also deals with the death of a father figure.

I lost my own dad last October, just as I began writing The Island Daughter, so some of my grief spilt over onto the page. It was extremely difficult to transpose my own feelings to the characters, but it also helped to exorcise the raw pain I felt at the time.

The Åland Islands

One of the main characters in The Island Daughter is its setting on the quirky Åland Islands. It’s where tourists from the mainland flock in the summer to sail in the Baltic or spend their holidays in small simple cottages by the sea, enjoying the peace and quiet and the nightless night of the North.

Flawed Characters

All of the characters in this novel are flawed in some way. When writing the book, I was thinking a lot about the loss of my father, but also about all of our weaknesses as people. My dad was far from perfect, yet I loved him dearly and miss him terribly. Everybody is lacking in some way, and I feel it’s important to show these imperfections in my characters.

Patrick, Alicia’s new love, is helpless to the charms of his wealthy ex-wife, who is also the mother of his beloved two daughters.

Alicia has suffered the loss of a child, and with the death of her step-father, her vulnerability is increased. Just as she’s faced with the possible break-up with Patrick, old secrets are revealed which further unsettles her present.

The story in The Island Daughter also follows Brit, Alicia’s school friend. After a life spent footloose and fancy-free, traveling the world working on cruise ships, she’s both horrified and delighted when she sees the thin pink lines on a test tube. But can she really settle down and have a baby with a man she’s only known for a matter of months?

Another strong, but flawed, character in the book is Alicia’s mother Hilda. After the loss of her loving husband, someone from her past suddenly appears on the islands. She’s forced to confront her own betrayal, which could forever destroy the relationship with her only daughter.

The Island Daughter is Book 3 in Love on the Island series but it can be enjoyed as a standalone read. It’s perfect for fans of Amanda Prowse, Elin Hilderbrand, and Elena Ferrante.

A prize-winning author, Helena Halme writes contemporary Nordic fiction with a sprinkling of Noir. The Nordic Heart series is an epic Cold War love story between a Finnish student and a British Navy Officer. Her new series, Love on the Island, is a heartwarming tale of family, love and impossible choices and set on the quirky and stunningly beautiful Åland Islands. Apart from writing stories set in her native Finland, Helena is addicted to Nordic Noir and dances to Abba songs when nobody’s watching.

You can find more about Helena on her website: www.helenahalme.com where she also blogs about writing, books, and life in general.

Helena Halme is the author of the new book The Island Daughter.

Connect with Helena

 Author Page

Facebook

Buy The Book
B088F25BCC cover image

Buy The Book

Sign up for our email and we’ll send you the best new books in your favorite genres weekly.

The post The Story Behind The Island Daughter by Helena Halme appeared first on NewInBooks.

The Story Behind Want You to Want Me by Lorelei James

By Lorelei James

So here’s a little confession…I haven’t always been a hockey fan. Shocking, right? But about 7-8 years ago when our oldest daughter moved to Denver, she and her then boyfriend, now husband, took us to an Avalanche game…and I was hooked. I started reading hockey romances and at some point, I decided I wanted to write a hero or two who make their livings on the ice. Plus, writing a hockey player hero gave me a legit excuse to watch hockey games as research, right? Not to mention attending hockey games in person.

While I love my male hockey players…I couldn’t help but notice there were very few romances written with a FEMALE hockey player as the heroine. As I spiraled down the rabbit hole of research, so many disparities between the sexes became apparent to me. Women hockey players aren’t treated equal on any level—college or professional, many times having to pay their own ways to games, share housing and hold 2 or 3 jobs to make ends meet to continue to play the sport they love. So I started watching women’s hockey and fell in love with it too. These women are dedicated as athletes and ambassadors for the sport of ice hockey for ALL ages and both sexes. I knew I needed to write a heroine who embodied the best of the sport.

Thus Gabriella Welk was born in my mind. She burst onto the scene and became a scene stealer in I Want You Back, book 1 in the Want You series. When it came time to pair Nolan Lund, brother of Jaxson Lund, the retired legendary hockey player, with his heroine, I knew feisty Gabi was perfect for him, even when on paper they were…more like paper and fire 😊

Take a chance on Want You To Want Me…it’s a fun, sexy, frenemies-to-lovers romance with a little hockey thrown in for fun!

 

Lorelei James is the author of the new book Want You to Want Me

Connect with Lorelei:
Author Website
 Twitter

Buy The Book
B081M8K1M2 cover image

Buy The Book

Sign up for our email and we’ll send you the best new books in your favorite genres weekly.

The post The Story Behind Want You to Want Me by Lorelei James appeared first on NewInBooks.

How I Wrote A Novel During the Pandemic by M.D. Massey

Writing a novel is one of the most daunting tasks a writer can attempt. All those words, all those pages, not to mention handling plots and sub-plots, pacing and dialogue, character development and themes—it’s enough to make you lose your hair, and I’m somewhat of an expert on that topic. Yet, finishing a novel is an achievement I would list among the most satisfying I’ve experienced in my nearly five decades of existence.

Prior to the pandemic, I’d written and published twenty urban fantasy and paranormal suspense novels, novellas, and short story collections. In fact, I’d just released the tenth novel in my Colin McCool urban fantasy series when the lockdowns went into effect. Needless to say, the lockdown wrecked my book launch. And while I did make up the sales in the months after, at the time it felt like a major setback.

But, one can cry over spilled milk, or one can acquire more cows. I knew that sitting on my thumbs fretting over the state of the world would not help me sell a single additional copy of my novels. So, I did what every experienced author does when a book release fails to go as planned—I got to work on my next book.

The Apocalypse Novelist—Or, Avoiding Information Overwhelm

Accomplished authors all share a secret that is pivotal to their success. And that secret is, they write every day, even when they don’t feel like it. I’ve never been one to experience writer’s block, but I have to admit that after I’d logged onto my social media accounts each morning, I felt anything but a strong motivation to write.

For that reason, the first thing I did was turn all that stuff off. For starters, I stopped watching the news, and I installed a browser plugin that blocks my Facebook feed. Then, I subscribed to a few email newsletters that boil each day’s top news stories down to a few key paragraphs, resolving to scan and delete them immediately when they hit my inbox.

This forced me only to use Facebook and other social media sites for reader interaction and to conduct business. In turn, that freed me up emotionally and timewise to attend to things that mattered most. Namely, seeing to my family’s welfare and finishing my next novel.

Then I went to work.

Writing When You Don’t Feel Like Writing

As I said, writers write. They don’t waste time vacillating over whether they should write, or complaining about writer’s block, or talking with the other writers in their writing group about how they’d finish their novel, if only they had the inspiration.

Instead, they sit down at their writing desks at the same time every day, and they write until they hit their goal for that day, be it a set period of time at the keys, or a certain number of words, pages, or scenes. This is the daily discipline that often separates the dilettante from the career author.

Yet, there were days that I simply did not want to write, especially after we lost two of the elder members of our family to COVID. Added to that emotional burden was the fact that my novel specifically dealt with themes of loss and death. Certainly, it made the writing of said related scenes and chapters all the more poignant, but it did nothing for my desire to write them.

My solution to this challenge was to make an agreement with myself that I would at least write one scene a day, or roughly 1,000 words. That might seem like a lot to some who are reading this, but for an author who routinely writes 3,000 to 5,000 words a day, it felt like throttling my muse. That said, by committing to a bare minimum output I was able to slog through those sections that caused me the most dread, without feeling guilty for missing my daily word count.

This proved to be the most important decision I made for my mental health and sanity as I finished the novel. Making periodic progress toward my goal gave me a regular and much-needed sense of accomplishment, a small daily emotional boost that helped me get through a very rough time. Indeed, it turned out to be my saving grace.

Other Tricks for Producing When the World Stands Still

Another minor challenge I faced during this time—and I’m sure other work-at-home parents can relate—was having my family home with me around the clock during the lockdowns. Thankfully my wife is an essential worker, and I am very grateful that we didn’t lose her income during this difficult time. However, with her working remotely, and my son completing his school year from home online, distractions were at an all-time high for this stay-at-home author.

To deal with that challenge, I locked myself in my office with a white noise machine running nearby, and a noise-canceling headset over my ears. Or, I’d turn up some fast and loud music and get lost in the rhythm while I worked on my novel. Both techniques served to drown out any background noise so that I wouldn’t break concentration during my scheduled daily writing sessions.

Additionally, during that time I experienced increased pressure from my “day job” as a small business consultant. I’ve run my consulting firm for years as a one-person show, and as you can imagine, my clients faced significant financial challenges after the lockdowns commenced. So, I had to increase the service and support I typically provided, all while continuing to make progress on my book.

How did I balance this? I dedicated specific time to each endeavor, and I made sure that I never allowed one to interfere with the other. Doing so prevented me from getting too distracted by my day job responsibilities to finish writing my novel.

The Final Outcome?

I’ve seen writers boasting on social media about how they used the lockdown to crank out twice as much work as before. I have about as much regard for those writers as I do for the social media influencers who encouraged their followers to learn a new language or get a degree during the lockdown. In dire times such as these, I see their admonishments as tone-deaf humble-bragging that serves no one but those who post such nonsense.

So, I’m not about to boast about my accomplishment, as it certainly took me longer to write this novel than any I’d written over the last three years. Yet, finish it I did, despite facing some personal and emotional obstacles that could’ve easily derailed the project. Druid Arcane releases July 31st, and I’m hoping that this launch goes much better than the last.

But if not, I know what I’ll be doing come August—namely, working on my next novel.

M.D. Massey is the author of the new book Druid Arcane.

Connect with M.D:
Author Website

 Twitter

Buy The Book
B08CY9LCZM cover image

Buy The Book

Sign up for our email and we’ll send you the best new books in your favorite genres weekly.

The post How I Wrote A Novel During the Pandemic by M.D. Massey appeared first on NewInBooks.

How I Wrote A Novel During the Pandemic by M.D. Massey

Writing a novel is one of the most daunting tasks a writer can attempt. All those words, all those pages, not to mention handling plots and sub-plots, pacing and dialogue, character development and themes—it’s enough to make you lose your hair, and I’m somewhat of an expert on that topic. Yet, finishing a novel is an achievement I would list among the most satisfying I’ve experienced in my nearly five decades of existence.

Prior to the pandemic, I’d written and published twenty urban fantasy and paranormal suspense novels, novellas, and short story collections. In fact, I’d just released the tenth novel in my Colin McCool urban fantasy series when the lockdowns went into effect. Needless to say, the lockdown wrecked my book launch. And while I did make up the sales in the months after, at the time it felt like a major setback.

But, one can cry over spilled milk, or one can acquire more cows. I knew that sitting on my thumbs fretting over the state of the world would not help me sell a single additional copy of my novels. So, I did what every experienced author does when a book release fails to go as planned—I got to work on my next book.

The Apocalypse Novelist—Or, Avoiding Information Overwhelm

Accomplished authors all share a secret that is pivotal to their success. And that secret is, they write every day, even when they don’t feel like it. I’ve never been one to experience writer’s block, but I have to admit that after I’d logged onto my social media accounts each morning, I felt anything but a strong motivation to write.

For that reason, the first thing I did was turn all that stuff off. For starters, I stopped watching the news, and I installed a browser plugin that blocks my Facebook feed. Then, I subscribed to a few email newsletters that boil each day’s top news stories down to a few key paragraphs, resolving to scan and delete them immediately when they hit my inbox.

This forced me only to use Facebook and other social media sites for reader interaction and to conduct business. In turn, that freed me up emotionally and timewise to attend to things that mattered most. Namely, seeing to my family’s welfare and finishing my next novel.

Then I went to work.

Writing When You Don’t Feel Like Writing

As I said, writers write. They don’t waste time vacillating over whether they should write, or complaining about writer’s block, or talking with the other writers in their writing group about how they’d finish their novel, if only they had the inspiration.

Instead, they sit down at their writing desks at the same time every day, and they write until they hit their goal for that day, be it a set period of time at the keys, or a certain number of words, pages, or scenes. This is the daily discipline that often separates the dilettante from the career author.

Yet, there were days that I simply did not want to write, especially after we lost two of the elder members of our family to COVID. Added to that emotional burden was the fact that my novel specifically dealt with themes of loss and death. Certainly, it made the writing of said related scenes and chapters all the more poignant, but it did nothing for my desire to write them.

My solution to this challenge was to make an agreement with myself that I would at least write one scene a day, or roughly 1,000 words. That might seem like a lot to some who are reading this, but for an author who routinely writes 3,000 to 5,000 words a day, it felt like throttling my muse. That said, by committing to a bare minimum output I was able to slog through those sections that caused me the most dread, without feeling guilty for missing my daily word count.

This proved to be the most important decision I made for my mental health and sanity as I finished the novel. Making periodic progress toward my goal gave me a regular and much-needed sense of accomplishment, a small daily emotional boost that helped me get through a very rough time. Indeed, it turned out to be my saving grace.

Other Tricks for Producing When the World Stands Still

Another minor challenge I faced during this time—and I’m sure other work-at-home parents can relate—was having my family home with me around the clock during the lockdowns. Thankfully my wife is an essential worker, and I am very grateful that we didn’t lose her income during this difficult time. However, with her working remotely, and my son completing his school year from home online, distractions were at an all-time high for this stay-at-home author.

To deal with that challenge, I locked myself in my office with a white noise machine running nearby, and a noise-canceling headset over my ears. Or, I’d turn up some fast and loud music and get lost in the rhythm while I worked on my novel. Both techniques served to drown out any background noise so that I wouldn’t break concentration during my scheduled daily writing sessions.

Additionally, during that time I experienced increased pressure from my “day job” as a small business consultant. I’ve run my consulting firm for years as a one-person show, and as you can imagine, my clients faced significant financial challenges after the lockdowns commenced. So, I had to increase the service and support I typically provided, all while continuing to make progress on my book.

How did I balance this? I dedicated specific time to each endeavor, and I made sure that I never allowed one to interfere with the other. Doing so prevented me from getting too distracted by my day job responsibilities to finish writing my novel.

The Final Outcome?

I’ve seen writers boasting on social media about how they used the lockdown to crank out twice as much work as before. I have about as much regard for those writers as I do for the social media influencers who encouraged their followers to learn a new language or get a degree during the lockdown. In dire times such as these, I see their admonishments as tone-deaf humble-bragging that serves no one but those who post such nonsense.

So, I’m not about to boast about my accomplishment, as it certainly took me longer to write this novel than any I’d written over the last three years. Yet, finish it I did, despite facing some personal and emotional obstacles that could’ve easily derailed the project. Druid Arcane releases July 31st, and I’m hoping that this launch goes much better than the last.

But if not, I know what I’ll be doing come August—namely, working on my next novel.

M.D. Massey is the author of the new book Druid Arcane.

Connect with M.D:
Author Website

 Twitter

Buy The Book
B08CY9LCZM cover image

Buy The Book

Sign up for our email and we’ll send you the best new books in your favorite genres weekly.

The post How I Wrote A Novel During the Pandemic by M.D. Massey appeared first on NewInBooks.

The Story Behind It’s Not Over by Willow Rose

By Willow Rose

The idea for this book came to me with the recent focus on the Madeleine McCann case again.

To those of you who might not know, it was the story of a three-year-old girl who went missing from a hotel room in Portugal in 2007 while her parents were having dinner in a restaurant nearby, and she slept in the hotel room. She was never found, and now there seem to be new theories about who took her, and German police believe they have found the killer.

That case has been haunting to me for many years, and I remember especially watching the parents during press conference after press conference, interview after interview, as the McCanns were under intense scrutiny and allegations of involvement in their daughter’s death, especially by the tabloid media. People kept looking at the mother and said that she didn’t cry enough, that she didn’t show enough emotion.

I recently thought to myself, what if it happened again? What if they had another child, and ten years later, that one disappeared too? It would be pretty hard at this point not to look very closely at the parents. It would be tough for the media and public opinion not to conclude that something had to be very off with those parents.
Something like this doesn’t happen twice, and to the same people, does it?

Willow Rose is the author of the new book It’s Not Over.

Connect with Willow:
Author Page
Twitter

Buy The Book
B088HGX7HW cover image

Buy The Book

Sign up for our email and we’ll send you the best new books in your favorite genres weekly.

The post The Story Behind It’s Not Over by Willow Rose appeared first on NewInBooks.

The Story Behind It’s Not Over by Willow Rose

By Willow Rose

The idea for this book came to me with the recent focus on the Madeleine McCann case again.

To those of you who might not know, it was the story of a three-year-old girl who went missing from a hotel room in Portugal in 2007 while her parents were having dinner in a restaurant nearby, and she slept in the hotel room. She was never found, and now there seem to be new theories about who took her, and German police believe they have found the killer.

That case has been haunting to me for many years, and I remember especially watching the parents during press conference after press conference, interview after interview, as the McCanns were under intense scrutiny and allegations of involvement in their daughter’s death, especially by the tabloid media. People kept looking at the mother and said that she didn’t cry enough, that she didn’t show enough emotion.

I recently thought to myself, what if it happened again? What if they had another child, and ten years later, that one disappeared too? It would be pretty hard at this point not to look very closely at the parents. It would be tough for the media and public opinion not to conclude that something had to be very off with those parents.
Something like this doesn’t happen twice, and to the same people, does it?

Willow Rose is the author of the new book It’s Not Over.

Connect with Willow:
Author Page
Twitter

Buy The Book
B088HGX7HW cover image

Buy The Book

Sign up for our email and we’ll send you the best new books in your favorite genres weekly.

The post The Story Behind It’s Not Over by Willow Rose appeared first on NewInBooks.