The Story Behind Forbidden Letters by Elin Peer

By Elin Peer

People sometimes ask me what has surprised me the most about being an author. I have to say that it’s the level of support and friendship that I’ve found among my readers. It has blown my mind, the way readers breathe life into my characters by talking about their motives, desires, and personas as if they were real people. Not to mention readers making playlists of music that the characters would listen to, or come up with pictures of how they think the characters would look in real life. It’s amazing!

I was also overwhelmed by the numbers of readers asking me for more books in the Men of the North series. You see, originally, I only planned for five books. Flattered by their interest, I added another five books to the series with tales from the future where women rule the world. Still it wasn’t enough for them.

My newest book, Forbidden Letters, is proof that it pays off to connect with authors and ask for more. It’s a stand-alone bonus story for the fans of the Men of the North series which can be read before or after the series. It was only supposed to be a short story, but the characters went on quite a journey with a lot of dramatic plot twists that turned it into a normal-sized book. I’m glad I stuck with it though, because this book has been extremely well received. And for me, it serves as a declaration of love from me to my readers saying, I hear you and you matter a ton to me.

Working alone from home, the messages I get from around the world with words of encouragement or curious questions, often make my day. Over the last two years, the readers and I have laughed and cried with the big alpha males from the north and the strong women from the south. Readers have gushed about the uniqueness of the ten books. They point out the depth of the characters, the strong dialogue, the food for thought, and the fast pace which makes the books hard to put down. It’s rare to find a series where each book is different in tone and style, offering a variation of adventure, suspense, love, and humor.

If you’re open to trying something new, here’s Forbidden Letters for you.

I should warn you though that this is not a clean romance!

The Men of the North don’t play nice, they swear a lot, and although this is in no way erotica, you have to be okay with a few steamy scenes.

The best part is, that in case you love Forbidden Letters – there’s ten more in the series for you to binge read.

 

Elin Peer is the author of the new book Forbidden Letters.

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Interview with Lawrence J. Epstein, author of The Hunted Girl

What can you tell us about your new release, The Hunted Girl?

Although The Hunted Girl is in a series, all the books in that series can stand alone. No knowledge of the previous books is needed. This book is about a little girl who sees her parents shot. She also sees the killer. Or does she? Political fixer Danny Ryle is out to help people who need it. He is determined to save this hunted girl. There is also a story about a woman who saw a man once, on a train, thirty years earlier. Now she has won a lottery and wants to find that man. Danny must also cope with a very unwelcome visitor who knows Danny’s wife.

What books are currently on your night stand?

I’m reading a lot of books about writing now and, of course, some mysteries. I’m saddened that it is difficult for me to read contemporary mysteries. I’m worried that I’ll copy their style. But I’m re-reading On Writing Well by William Zinsser and several books about writing mysteries.

What advice would you give your teenage self?

I was a very active reader as a teenager, so I wouldn’t change that. I’d tell my self to have some confidence, not to be afraid to fail, and to write, write, write. I wish my teenage self had volunteered to work on a local paper.

If you had an extra hour each day, how would you spend it?

Re-writing. I never have enough time to rewrite. I’m a believer in the old truth that writers don’t know how to write until they know how to rewrite.

What makes your world go round? Why does it bring you joy?

This is an easy question for me. My family makes my world go around. My wife Sharon and I have been married for 46 years and have four children and five grandchildren.I love telling stories to those grandchildren. Besides them, I think about my writing.

What scene in The Hunted Girl was your favorite to write?

The first scene was my favorite. That’s because I had to introduce the little girl Jennifer, explain her situation and establish an interesting bond between Jennifer and Danny Ryle, the protagonist. I should add that I enjoy almost every scene I write. I figure if I don’t enjoy them, neither will my readers.

Lawrence J. Epstein is the author of the new book The Hunted Girl.

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Interview with Kay Bell, Author of The American Governess

What can you tell us about your new release, The American Governess?

The American Governess is a novel about life, love and loss. It’s 1967. Young Becky Golding leaves New York to work as a teacher on a cattle station in North Queensland Australia. Told partly from the perspective of her indigenous housekeeper and friend, The American Governess is a coming-of-age story, set at a time when there was social unrest in both USA and Australia, and when women’s roles were evolving. The novel explores the isolation and hostility of the Australian bush as well as its extraordinary beauty, and the challenges graziers face every day just to earn a living.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

I’ve written fiction for as long as I can remember. When I write, I create a world into which I can escape. That appeals to me. I was a voracious reader as a child; while other kids dreamed of becoming rock stars or firemen, I dreamed of becoming an author. I am lucky to be encouraged by my husband, TW Lawless, who is also an author, and to have a very supportive family.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

Wow, only five? I recently reread Enid Bagnold’s National Velvet and remembered exactly why I adored it when I first read it as a child. To that I’d add (for various reasons and not necessarily in this order) Frederick Forsyth’s The Odessa File, George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina. And am I allowed to mention my husband’s debut novel, Homecountry? There are so many more I’d love to add to the list. I guess my tastes are diverse.

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask?

If we’re suspending reality, I’m tempted to say James Joyce. I’d probe him with, “Ulysses: please explain”. Although I don’t know that anyone would take on a second episode after that.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

Creation. People who never were. The beauty of words, their sound, the beat of a phrase and the rhythm of life exposed on a page. I love it all.

What is a typical day like for you?

I begin writing first thing after breakfast. I’m notorious for putting everything else second, and I mean everything. When I’m writing, “I’ll [insert verb here] in a minute” never happens. Before I know it, I’ve been going for hours and haven’t heard a thing. Meanwhile, life’s spinning around me but never seems to catch hold. A quick break and it’s back to the computer. I’m happiest when I’m writing. Anything. Even emails.

What scene in The American Governess was your favorite to write?

That’s a bit like asking a parent which child they love the best. I don’t want to reveal a spoiler, so I’ll just say the bit where Chase visits Nellie at her home nearing the end of the book. It’s probably pretty obvious that I love Nellie. Heck, I love them all. Except possibly Gladys MacGregor.

Do you have a motto, quote or philosophy you live by?

The measure of a person does not reside in their bank balance. I made that one up.
In an increasingly self-centred world, I think we need to remind ourselves that kindness and respect are not signs of weakness.

Kay Bell is the author of the new book The American Governess.

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Interview with Joe M. Solomon, Author of The Light: Houston, Texas

What can you tell us about your new release, The Light: Houston, Texas?

It is a science fiction thriller that revolves around a group of ordinary college music students whose world is turned upside down when mysterious lights in the sky appear and drive anyone who looks up at them insane. I’ve always enjoyed seeing how different characters in stories react when they’re taken completely out of their element as they are in this one. I also enjoy fast-paced, action-filled stories in which a small group of people have to work together to survive.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

I’ve always enjoyed creating new worlds, ever since I was a child. Kids often read comic books: Batman, Superman, etcetera. But instead of reading the comic books, I used to cut out the pictures and create my own storyboard. I didn’t actually learn the story of the superheroes until they were made into movies, so I think I was always destined to become a writer.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

The Writer’s Journey by Christopher Vogler

On Writing by Stephen King

Complete Poems and Plays of T. S. Eliot

The Stand by Stephen

Books of Blood by Clive Barker

You always write about murder! Why is that?

Stephen King. I’ve always admired his writing and know he used to be an English teacher, so I would ask him what books he would recommend for the newest generation of readers who might not have explored fiction written before they were born.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

I love the process of creating new realities. Some ideas I already have in mind before I begin crafting a story. However, as I write, events begin to unfold and expand beyond anything I had imagined. That is so exciting.

What is a typical day like for you?

As far as writing goes, a typical day finds me embroiled in at least one of the following: I’m beginning a new story, am continuing one I’ve already begun, and am rereading a completed project.

What scene in The Light: Houston, Texas was your favorite to write?

I love the opening in which Robert, the main character, rests in his graduate house apartment, speaking to his girlfriend on the phone. She wants him to drive over and see her, but he is tired from the late night they’d shared. He wants to sleep a couple of hours before he swings by. Less than please, she hangs up on him. Poor Robert sits there, contemplating love, and has no idea that not only his world, but the entire world is about to change.

Do you have a motto, quote or philosophy you live by?

Be kind.

The Light: Houston, Texas

 

Joe M. Solomon is the author of the new book The Light: Houston, Texas.

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Interview with Krista Lakes, author of The Other Billionaire Brother

What can you tell us about your new release, The Other Billionaire Brother?

The Other Billionaire Brother is a fun love triangle between two billionaire brothers. Nora has been in love with the younger brother for most of her life, but he’s getting married to an heiress. The older brother tries to keep her away from the younger brother and in doing so ends up falling in love with her as well! She then has to choose which brother is actually the love of her life.

What books are currently on your night stand?

So many! I have a Julie Kagawa novel, a Jill Shalvis, a Nora Flite, and Julia Kent’s newest release. I’m not getting much sleep!

What advice would you give your teenage self?

It’s okay not to be perfect. It’s okay to struggle. Failure isn’t the worst thing in the world.

If you had an extra hour each day, how would you spend it?

Sleeping. Or knitting. Or walking my dog. Can I have three more hours?

What makes your world go round? Why does it bring you joy?

My kids. They are my moon and stars. (And coffee because I wouldn’t be able to handle my kids without coffee.)

What scene in The Other Billionaire Brother was your favorite to write?

This is hard. I liked writing the witty banter, so I’ll go with when the younger brother doesn’t recognize her and is flirting like crazy. She uses the opportunity to tease and flirt back.

 

Krista Lakes is the author of the new book The Other Billionaire Brother.

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Interview with Elizabeth Buhmann, Author of Blue Lake

What can you tell us about your new release, Blue Lake?

Blue Lake is a murder mystery set in the middle of the 20th century. The action of the book begins in 1968, when Regina Hannon learns that a long-lost sister’s drowning way back in the nineteen forties was briefly investigated as a murder. Regina, whose family was destroyed by that death, sets out to discover what happened.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

I’ve always been a reader, so I just naturally wanted to try my own hand at writing. An English teacher in high school encouraged me—she told me I could write “the good stuff.” And I’ve always loved mysteries. I started reading Nancy Drew in grade school and graduated to Agatha Christie and Erle Stanley Gardener by the time I was in junior high. I’m pretty widely read in literature, too, but mysteries are my guilty pleasure. I can read a hundred detective novels in a year!

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

I love Edith Wharton—The House of Mirth is a great book, but amazingly, she has also written one of the best short stories ever (“Roman Fever”) AND one of the best novellas ever (Summer). Crime and Punishment is great book. Though it’s on most lists of great novels, it is often overlooked as one of the earliest and best works of crime fiction. Lolita is another book I greatly admire. I reread it twice while writing my first book, Lay Death at her Door, mainly because in Lolita, Nabokov does a masterful job of handling an unlikable (despicable, I could say) protagonist.
My best books list evolves over the years, and I have two lists, actually—best novels and best mysteries. Among best-ever mystery writers I count Ruth Rendell and Ross (not John D) Macdonald. Both are great mystery plotters, and both have influenced me.

You always write about murder! Why is that?

To me it is the ultimate drama, when human emotions result in one person killing another. I try to treat murder with respect, for the extreme and shocking act that it is for real. I love a good cozy mystery as much as the next person, but I cannot write one. Murder is a deadly serious topic—could not be more so.
I also read mysteries and thrillers that feature serial killers, but these are not my favorites at all. Serial killers fall too far outside the realm of normal human emotional reality. I am more interested in a murder that is understandable, so to speak.
I would not go so far as to say that we are all capable of killing another human being. I have no idea whether that is true—probably not? But I think we all recognize and experience emotions which, if we were tested to a limit and beyond, could make us really want to kill another person.
Laws are quite clear about issues such as self-defense and justifiable homicide, but our individual perceptions of these concepts, in extreme and highly emotional circumstances, can be quite elastic. It may well be that anyone who murders has a deeply flawed character. But character flaws are universally human, too.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

Having written. Getting started on a new book can be very hard and frustrating. Downright painful. When a story takes off, though, time flies and I disappear. When that happens, it’s fun to read what you’ve written, and of course it’s always your best raw material. Then I shift into rewriting and developing the manuscript, and I enjoy that part immensely. The crafty side of writing is interesting and challenging—how to get the right effect, how to draw the reader into the imaginary world I’m visiting in my study every day.

What is a typical day like for you?

I do my writing very early in the morning. I am such a morning person that I almost come out the other side as a night owl. I like to get up at about four o’clock! My dog has developed an uncanny ability to know when it’s time to make sure I’m in my office. Later in the morning, I practice Tai Chi at a park near my house. I also spend a lot of time in my garden, which I’ve been cultivating for many years. And of course I read. I never watch TV, but I’m addicted to Sudoku and jigsaw puzzles.

What scene in Blue Lake was your favorite to write?

All the scenes in the attic of the old house. I love attics. I used to pass time in the attic of my grandparents’ house, which was a lot like Blue Lake. It was full of very old things that were treasures to me—old letters and papers from the turn of the century (1900, not 2000!) and fancy old dresses in trunks. Old sepia photographs. And I love the idea that these vestiges of the past could come together to tell a story as dramatic as an old murder.

Do you have a motto, quote or philosophy you live by?

I once read that Confucius said, “He who has no patience cannot win.” I’m not sure he ever actually said that—I can’t find it anywhere—but I adopted the saying many years ago, except I say SHE who has no patience cannot win. I’m a tortoise, not a hare. My chosen endeavors, writing novels and learning Tai Chi, require a sustained effort over a long time, and this is the phrase I use to steady myself when I feel like I’ll never reach my goal.

Elizabeth Buhmann is the author of the new book Blue Lake.

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Interview with S.J. Hartland, author of The Last Seer King

What can you tell us about your new release, The Last Seer King?

The Last Seer King picks up where The 19th Bladesman ended.
The Last Seer King is a story of dark magic, obsession, dangerous prophecy, and the redemption found in friendship.
After the events at the end of The 19th Bladesman and the first chapters of The Last Seer King, Val is a prisoner with just one chance to get to Kaell – play out a dangerous, psychological game or reveal the secret that will destroy him.
As for Kaell… fate isn’t quite done with him yet. For the darkness taking over the kingdom can’t be defeated with the sword, only with the heart.

What books are currently on your night stand?

The pile of books on my nightstand is about to topple over.
I’ve picked up a copy of Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo at the suggestion of a lovely book blogger I’ve met, I’m a few chapters into Jenn Lyons’ The Ruin of Kings, and my niece just gave me CS Pacat’s volume one of Fence. I’m a fencer so I’m really exited about reading that. I loved CS Pacat’s Captive Prince series. However, I’ve been distracted by all of these by Australian thriller writer Tim Ayliffe’s State of Fear, which so far is pretty good.

What advice would you give your teenage self?

To care less about what everyone except your family and friends think of you.

If you had an extra hour each day, how would you spend it?

The first thing that comes into my mind is “sleep.” But I often imagine how much more writing I’d get done if I only needed to sleep a few hours a night, so most likely, I’d use the time to write.

What makes your world go round? Why does it bring you joy?

There’s joy in music, in an amazing book, in having a day before you when you don’t have any commitments and can just write. But without close friends, without family, none of these things mean anything.

What scene in The Last Seer King was your favorite to write?

I loved writing the verbal tussle between Val and the sorceress Myranthe Damadar. She has all the power, but she still needs something from him that he won’t easily surrender. It felt like a risk, because the scenes are dialogue heavy, rather than action.
I also enjoy writing the scenes between Val and Heath, because Heath exasperates Val so much. Actually, any Heath scene is fun, because he is so witty and sarcastic. Though, I have to shake him off if I’m going to dinner or meeting friends after writing a Heath scene, otherwise I’m still in his head and a bit sharp tongued!

S.J. Hartland is the author of the new book The Last Seer King.

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Interview with B. Lance Jenkins, Author of A New Requiem

What can you tell us about your new release, A New Requiem?

A New Requiem is the story of a gay community chorus director and teacher who is wrongly accused of murdering a 17-year old boy and son of a promiment family in a fictional North Carolina town known as Freeden, and how the small, radically-fundamental town mounts against him simply because he is gay and largely different from the town’s populous. It’s a work of literary fiction with elements of a crime and drama thriller that calls for empathy and understanding toward things different than what we are used to. Having lived in the South my entire life, I see the relevance of this message nearly everyday, but it’s not just a message to be heard in the rural South. I think we can all take a hard look at the way we treat others different than us, and that’s the message behind A New Requiem. It’s quite pertinent in a time like the one we live in today.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

My high school teachers and college professors. Family. Friends. But no one inspired this story more than my friend, Dwight Berry. The book is dedicated to him; he was my former vocal mentor, colleague, and friend, and is the model for the character Dwight Kerry in A New Requiem. The real-life Dwight never experienced any of the major events in the novel, but he was the only person in my life that a character in the book mimics identically. He was gay, and in many ways inspired the message in the novel of empathy and understanding. He is the reason I was inspired to write this story. So far as becoming an author, I just love to tell stories. Anytime I’ve ever read a book or watched a movie, I’ve imagined my own stories and ideas coming to life in some format. In large part, I’ve always been this way…if I want something to come to fruition, I work to make it happen, regardless of whether or not it’s going to be easy. The story behind A New Requiem was and still is important to me, and when I first developed the concept, I knew it was the perfect fit for my longtime dream of writing a novel. And so, the two became one, and with a lot of support and encouragement from family and friends along the way, my career as an author was born.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

George Orwell’s Animal Farm and 1984 always stood out to me. They are both works of literary fiction with deep meaning, and in many ways that is what I try to accomplish in my own writing. No other novel, though, touches me quite like To Kill a Mockingbird. Its themes are still very pertinent today. Other than those, I’m typically a fan of the classics like The Great Gatsby and Catcher in the Rye. Call me old school, I’m fine with it.

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask?

J.K. Rowling. She has done what few others have done with the Harry Potter series and beyond. We may not typically write in the same genre, but I love her often-criticized long sentences and adverbs. Editors may not like those elements of writing, but she does it her own way and doesn’t care. I love that about her!

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

It is one of the most therapeutic things I do. If you love to write…make time for it. It’s rejuvenating and can make you better in all facets of life. I think that’s applicable to anything you are passionate about. Do more of what is good for you and makes you happy, and you’ll see the effects. And you’ll be pleased.

What is a typical day like for you?

A New Requiem is my debut novel, so I do not write full-time and typically only write at night. I actually manage an insurance agency day-to-day and own a media firm that, among other things, operates a local radio station in the NC Triad region. Days are typically crazy and busy, but I’m thankful to get to read and write at night. It usually wraps up a crazy day with an opportunity to unwind and partake in my passion. Isn’t that how we all want to end our busy days…peacefully, in our own way?

What scene in A New Requiem was your favorite to write?

My favorite part to write was Chapter 3 when Ben Bailey, the main character, and Dwight Kerry have their first dialogue in the novel and ultimately go and enjoy dinner at David’s Restaurant after the Requiem concert. It’s a moment the two share laughs, sadness, anxiety, and good Southern food and wine. It’s the last normal moment, really, for the both of them before Dwight’s arrest. You get to see Dwight in all his glory, and he deserves it, because before he is partially broken down by the corrupt justice system that wrongly accuses and oppresses him, he is a lively, flamboyant, and eccentric character. And it’s on full display in Chapter 3. Aside from that, perhaps the most meaningful chapter to write was Chapter 8. It is, perhaps, the most gut-wrenching, disturbing part of the entire book. I can recall two times I cried while writing this novel…once at the end of writing, just for the sheer joy of being done, but the other time was at the end of Chapter 8 when we learn about the death of the 17-year old boy named Braxton Jones whose murder lies essentially at the center of the largest themes of the novel. I finished typing, stood up, and walked around my office in tears. I cried for several reasons: one, that it was as disturbing as it was, but most notably because I realized that I wasn’t just putting down words to complete a dream of writing a novel anymore — it was more than that. This chapter was something that was supposed to hit the reader hard, something that was supposed to make us all really rethink our preconceived ideas in life and the consequences of possessing harsh, hateful beliefs and feelings toward others. Something that meant something…that’s when I realized that this book wasn’t just a suspenseful crime thriller anymore. It was a story that could mean something, a story that was pertinent, and something that could very well stand the test of time.

Do you have a motto, quote or philosophy you live by?

Doing your best is up to you. It is a daily choice. I wrote A New Requiem over a seven-month period (May-December 2018) after a long days of work, exercise, and dinner. I usually started writing around 9:00pm every night and went into the early morning hours everyday. It’s that choice that made my debut novel a possibility. Anyone can do what they want if they make the choice to do it. It’s that simple.

B. Lance Jenkins is the author of the new book A New Requiem.

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The Story Behind Free To Live By Tracey Jerald

By Tracey Jerald

Love isn’t perfect. It’s messy and complicated; just like life is. It can be brutal but if we’re lucky, there’s someone out there we’ll find who will want to take our hand and say, “You are worth it.”

That was the jumping point for Holly Freeman. As a photographer in her adoptive family’s renowned wedding-event planning business, she uses her camera to mask the vulnerability she never let go of as a result of a horrendous childhood. That is until she became involved with a local fundraiser for the first responders where she lives in Collyer, Connecticut.

Enter Joseph Bianco, a broody fireman, who has been heading the fundraising committee. A single-dad with the weight of the world on his shoulders, he’s close to the end of his rope when he meets Holly.

Wait, do you hear that sound? That’s the emotional freight train carrying the baggage of these two characters who start out as friends.

I was sitting in front of a roaring fire on vacation in Montana when the idea of throwing these two characters came to mind. I knew I needed to tell Holly’s story – with a twist. And there it was. The fire luring me deeper into its depths. Daring me. Could I? Should I?

Joe’s story had already been told. And while I was frustrated by the hand life dealt him, did Holly need his baggage on top of her own?

Oh, yeah. Absolutely.

What they ended up becoming were two souls forged from the flames of life’s fire; each who gave up on the idea of love. They balanced out the other. They gave each other perspective.

They gave the other the will to live.

In this book, it’s not just Holly’s story who had to be concluded. I had to snip off any loose ends from her other four sisters and her brother. Phil – Holly’s brother – made a noteworthy appearance in every book of the Amaryllis Series. He wasn’t always there for comic relief, and Holly’s story showcased that.

What he offered was balance. And in life, we do need that.

No, love isn’t perfect. Neither is life. What love gives us the will to survive life’s tragedies.

For me, readers, even if we’re not perfect, we have the right to a Happily Ever After. To have hope that love can come even amidst some pretty horrific reality.

This story taught me to take your best shot when you’re given the opportunity. Love is always worth the chance.

You get the idea. At least I did.

Tracey Jerald is the author of the new book Free To Live.

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Interview with Mark Reps, Author of Native Trouble

What or who inspired you to become an author?

I have always loved storytelling. Beginning around a campfire as a kid to long winded tales told in bar rooms and at parties I always found a good tale fascinating. Hearing stories, then becoming a reader of many different kinds of styles of literature made me wonder if I could write. I had several teachers along the way who encouraged me to expand upon the stories I would write in classes. So, I decided to start with a story I knew well. My first book, Heartland Heroes is loosely based on events from my childhood. After taking some writing classes I decided to tell that story. It holds up well and is an homage, in a way, to Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn. Quite by accident I had a great encounter with Tony Hillerman a few years after that. He spoke about writing, what it meant to him and how he viewed the craft of writing. I eventually became pen pals with him and he did a bit of tutoring along the way. His encouragement helped me see both the good and the bad in my writing and taught me to be disciplined if I wanted to be good.

What can you tell us about your new release, Native Trouble?

In books 1-8 of the ZEB HANKS series we have watched Zeb grow as a sheriff, a man and a human being. In book 9 all that he has worked for and grown into is about to blow up in his face as he is knocked off his game. The people of Graham County begin to lose faith in their sheriff as a crime wave sweeps the county. As the tension of small town politics and crime intersect Zeb encounters even more trouble. Is it just criminals at work or is someone out to get Zeb personally? While suspects are many, leads are few. With the election at hand, Zeb must quickly find his nearly invisible enemies.

Simultaneously Zeb is deepening his relationship with Echo Skysong. She brings a healthy dose of native mysticism as her relationship with Zeb grows ever closer and her power grows as the Knowledge Keeper of all the People. Ultimately, she too becomes a target. Native mysticism as well as military and political intrigue all play a role in the unfolding of this intricately woven tale.

With tensions rising and situations altering rapidly, change must come to Graham County. The circumstances, sometimes hidden, sometimes in plain sight, lead to a showdown that could change Zeb and his life forever. The impending election will possibly determine the fate of Sheriff Zeb Hanks.

NATIVE TROUBLE is the 9th book in the ZEB HANKS: Small Town Sheriff Big Time Trouble series. Read it as a standalone or as part of the series. Other books in the series include NATIVE BLOOD, HOLES IN THE SKY, ADIOS ANGEL, NATIVE JUSTICE, NATIVE BONES, NATIVE WARRIOR, NATIVE EARTH and NATIVE DESTINY.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, Neither Wolf Nor Dog by Kent Nerburn, The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco, The Discovery of Heaven by Harry Mulisch and The Brothers K by David Duncan.

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask?

I would bring Mark Twain back from the dead as my first guest. I would dig and dig and find out what made his imagination flourish. On the show would also be Edgar Allan Poe, inventor of the mystery novel.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

I love the process and the research. The process is a beautiful discipline and the research is always highly educational. I always learn that I don’t know a lot and by digging deep I can at least learn some things. The imagination is always sparked by new knowledge.

What is a typical day like for you?

I try to write, rewrite, edit, research, etc four hours a day. When I find a book that moves me I devour it. I do crossword puzzles for fun. I am currently learning a new branch of acupuncture known as esoteric acupuncture. I greatly enjoy keeping in touch with friends old and new.

What scene in Native Trouble was your favorite to write?

I always enjoy writing the opening sequence. It opens my heart and head to the story and it draws the reader in and tells them, and me as the writer, where the story may possibly be going. I love to get my protagonist, Sheriff Zeb Hanks, set into action and get him thinking/working/creating and of course, into some trouble.

Do you have a motto, quote or philosophy you live by?

I have a boat load of philosophy that moves me forward but it all boils down to keep on keepin’ on.

Mark Reps is the author of the new book Native Trouble.

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NATIVE TROUBLE (ZEB HANKS:Small Town Sheriff Big Time Trouble Book 9)

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The post Interview with Mark Reps, Author of Native Trouble appeared first on NewInBooks.