Interview with Jules Adrienn, Author of Two Days to Die

What can you tell us about your new release, Two Days to Die?

Two Days to Die is my take on what I call a ticking-clock plot. The story revolves around a high-stakes game set up by an escaped drug lord who’s seeking revenge against the people who put him in prison. The first person who crosses a remote island wilderness in two days lives. Everyone else dies along with their families. Add in a pack of wolves, competitors trying to outsmart one another, raging whitewater rivers, booby traps, ruthless killers, and, of course, a budding romance, and you have a thriller that’s built for speed. Two Days also pays homage to one of my favorite literary tropes—the unknown loner who strolls into a fight between good and evil. Whether it’s a Clint Eastwood spaghetti western or the latest Jack Reacher novel, I just love it when someone as nasty and mean as the bad guys walks onto the scene to even the odds. I think it’s some kind of primitive emotion that’s hard-wired into our brains. When a truly evil person is confronted by a good person who is looking forward to the fight, we just can’t look away.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

My love of reading is what turned me into an author. I’ve heard of authors who had mentors or parents or teachers who cultivated their literary aspirations, but I’m not convinced that a person would be successful if they were relying on someone else to motivate and shepherd their artistic journey. I believe that if you’d be satisfied to write for your entire life and never be published, then you’re prepared to follow the path of a writer. It’s hard. And being good enough to be published is a prize that is humbling and empowering.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

I didn’t intend to do come up with such a diverse list but I think there’s something for everyone here:

Horror/Suspense – I was and will forever be astounded by The Ruins by Scott Smith. It is dread personified.

Young Adult – The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton is magic. The group of kids, the love they have for one another, and the tragedy of it all. Unbelievable.

Chick-Lit – Something Borrowed by Emily Giffen is captivating. It hooked me from the start. She captures how love has a mind of its own—even at the expense of things we hold precious, like friendship.

Thriller – Persuader by Lee Child is top of the heap. There’s something almost medieval about it. A lonely castle. A maiden in distress. A strong knight who must vanquish a dragon (well, not a dragon, but a man who may as well be one). It’s a simple thriller formula executed to the nth degree.

Sci-Fi – Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton is a classic. This is a book that is probably the number one archetype for summer blockbuster—in literature and movies. It’s such an outlandish premise. Not only are dinosaurs being brought back to life, but they’re being used to populate an entertainment park. What!? Unbelievable fun, mind-bending science, and nonstop action. Who could want more?

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask

I think Lee Child would be a fantastic guest. The talk show would be set at a bar. It would be called, “Great Minds Drink Alike.” We’d have our drinks and off we’d go. And with Lee, there’s only one question I’d need to get him to talk all night—“Tell me the difference between literary and genre fiction?” It’s a question that’s come up in many an MFA program and writers conference, but I think Lee would give a take on it that would make for great television.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

Being done with a manuscript. By done, I mean edited, cover art completed, ready-to-be-purchased done. Because up until that time, it’s always on my mind. It’s great to finally put something to bed.

What is a typical day like for you?

My day is little different than anyone else’s. I’m taking the dog out to poop. Cleaning the dishes. Making lunch out of questionable lunchmeat I found in the back of the fridge. All of this is wrapped around sessions of writing, outlining, and editing. I once heard a story that made me laugh that probably sums it up. An author bounds into the kitchen where her husband is cooking breakfast and says, “My magnum opus is nearly complete. It has all the elements of best-selling genre fiction. It’s written with a style that surpasses the world’s greatest literary giants. And it finally provides an answer to the meaning of life. I’m going into my office now to write the final scene!” The husband turns around, scoops an egg from the frying pan onto a plate on the table, and replies, “That’s great. Eat your eggs.” So that’s my answer. The day of a writer is like any other.

What scene from Two Days to Die was your favorite to write?

Favorite is a little different than what I’d call it. How about, “heart-pounding?” In Two Days to Die, there’s a scene where I had to confront a phobia of mine. As a writer, I have to enter the mind of a character and live the moment with him or her, so this particular scene made me very uncomfortable. I had to keep stopping and telling myself it wasn’t real, and then I would reset and dive back in. It was awful. I couldn’t breathe. I was sweating. My heart was skipping beats. But in the end, I finished it and I believe it will put the reader into a place where the world falls away and they’re living the story through my character, moment by moment. A scene like that is always my favorite because it creates a space where the reader is sharing my experience. As you’ll note, I didn’t describe the scene. I’ll leave that up to the reader to figure out. I’m sure it won’t be hard.

Do you have a motto, quote, or philosophy you live by?

 

Jules Adrienn is the author of the new book Two Days to Die.

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Interview with Krissy Daniels, author of L.O.V.E

What can you tell us about your new release, L.O.V.E.?

L.O.V.E. is a story about fate, integrity, and faithfulness. Natalie and Cole share an undeniable attraction. Unfortunately, they’re committed to other people. Hard as they try to resist temptation, life keeps bringing them together — through friends, family, and very extraordinary events. Their love story is a bumpy ride, for sure. I’ve never put two characters through so much turmoil to be together.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

I’ve always loved storytelling. My mom and my childhood best friend relentlessly encouraged me to write books. It wasn’t until after my children were in grade school that I wrote my first novel. I wasn’t sure what to do with my manuscript, so I reached out to an old high school classmate, Rebecca Zanetti, who had recently published. She encouraged me to join RWA and a local chapter, so I did. And the rest is history.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

That’s an impossible question to answer. I read and fall in love with too many books.

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask

I would ask J.R. Ward what she has against baby powder.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

I love, love, love all the different characters I get to become while writing. I get to escape into different worlds, and explore all the dark, dirty, quirky, beautiful personalities.

What is a typical day like for you?

Day job. Come home and write. Take care of household duties when I can. Read. Sleep. Repeat.

What book from L.O.V.E. was your favorite to write?

Oh, Lordy. Tough question. I have a few. The one that stands out most, I suppose, is when Cole shows up drunk on Natalie’s doorstep. This scene is pivotal because Natalie has a tough choice to make. She can give in to temptation and get revenge on her childhood tormentor, or she can walk away and sacrifice her best friend and family and the city she loves so that Cole can move on and be happy with his fiancé.

Do you have a motto, quote, or philosophy you live by?

Last year, my motto was “Fuck it.” This year? “Give it to God.” All my burdens, and fears, even my joys and celebrations. I’m not strong enough to carry them most of the time, and thank goodness I don’t have to.

Krissy Daniels is the author of the new book L.O.V.E

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Interview with Jesse Nolan Bailey, Author of The Jealousy of Jalice

What can you tell us about your new release, The Jealousy of Jalice?

This debut novel features anti-heroines, demons, and deformed monsters of the forest. I wanted a story that wasn’t set in the typical Eurocentric medieval backdrop, and this resulted in unique cultures that support a diverse cast. The story delves into the themes of betrayal and atonement, and explores how a selfish decision can have lasting effects on the world. It is the first in a series titled A Disaster of Dokojin.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

I’ve been an avid reader since I was a kid. With every book I finished, I felt more compelled to join the ranks of my favorite authors on the bookself. Fantasy in particular has always been a favorite genre to read, and among my favorite authors are Robert Jordan and Patrick Rothfuss. The way those authors weave complex plots together over the course of several epic books in a series both mystifies and inspires me.

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask

Probably Brandon Sanderson. For Sanderson, I’d want to know what the experience was like to finish The Wheel of Time series after the death of Robert Jordan, and what that has meant for his career.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

The fact that anything can happen within a story, and that words have such power. Stories are a way of teaching ourselves what we value or find interesting, and writing offers me that route of exploring my own questions about life.

What is a typical day like for you?

Oh goodness, I’m quite boring. If it’s not a week day (which means I’m working), and it’s instead the weekend, I’m probably writing at Barnes & Noble (prior to 2020 that is…) or out taking a stroll at the park. Nature and casual exercise are wonderful sources of inspiration sometimes. If it IS a week day, I listen to Youtube videos on aliens or the Let’s Read podcast as I work my day job.

What book from The Jealousy of Jalice was your favorite to write?

I don’t want to give away spoilers, but the scene where Jalice enters and explores the Black House for the first time as a young girl. When you read the book, you’ll understand the context. That scene involves a different type of environment anywhere else in the book.

Do you have a motto, quote, or philosophy you live by?

Not really, but a quote from Alan Watts probably summarizes how I feel and look at life: “I am absolutely amazed to discover myself on this rock ball, rotating around this spherical fire … it’s a very odd situation! And the more I look at things, I cannot get rid of the feeling that existence is quite weird.”

Jesse Nolan Bailey is the author of the new book The Jealousy of Jalice.

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Interview with Thomas Zman, Author of The Living Reminder

What can you tell us about your new release, The Living Reminder?

Each book in my Neuphobes Series explores different aspects as to how extraterrestrials have influenced mankind during the past millennia. My latest release in this Series, The Living Reminder, explores humanity’s final chapter as to just where the catastrophic conclusion of alien intervention inevitably leads. Elijah, my protagonist, had long ago been chosen to be the Living Reminder, and my book establishes the reasoning behind this as well as humanity’s bizarre acceptance to its annihilation. Befriending extraterrestrials, after their being released from imprisonment within the Earth, Elijah and the aliens inevitably learn from one another during their journey across the universe, growing spiritually while absolving the other of past sins.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

I was inspired to becoming an author back when I was young. Whenever I read a book–especially science fiction–I would always find myself pondering changes to the story line. I had my own sense as to how the plot should unfold, how the aliens should look and behave. I incorporated that thinking into what I remembered from high school, an English class where the teacher analyzed short stories; dissecting them, extracting the theme, humanitarian travails she felt the author strived to convey. I found it all very interesting and something I wanted to do myself. And so I have.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

Childhood’s End, Arthur C. Clarke
The Stand, Steven King
War of the Worlds, H G Wells
Fantastic Voyage, Isaac Asimov
Journey to the Center of the Earth, Jules Verne

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask

If I were to host a literary talk show, I would definitely want to interview Jules Verne. Having lived nearly two centuries ago, I would ask about his childhood, and just what experiences he had during those years that inspired his writing. I’ve always felt things that have touched your life during childhood fuel your imagination–yet back in his days I would think there were not that many to do such.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

My favorite thing about writing is the evolution of the story. At first it is just a concept, an outline. But as you work on it, put it aside to think about it, then go back and work on it more and more, it evolves into something phenomenal. Writing is something you can work on even when you’re not sitting in front of the computer. I tend to carry around the story with me (in my head) during most of my waking hours. Many times I find myself jotting down notes when I’m in the midst of doing other things. Yes, I am a daydreamer.

What is a typical day like for you?

My typical day consists of waking up before sunrise, making myself coffee, then watching about an hour of television: news, financial stuff, old westerns. I’m a channel surfer. I then make my way into my study (Thought Chamber, I like to call it) and troll around on the Internet for a bit. After that, I get serious and pick up on where I left off the following evening with whatever project I’m currently working on. I’ll write for a couple hours, then go and have breakfast, do some chores around the house, around the yard, run errands out to stores here and there–all this happening usually before lunch. This leaves the remainder of my day, into the evening, open for my writing. Depending on how far I am into a project, what point I’m at either developing plot or editing content, I’ll spend a minimum of 2 hours, sometimes as many as 12 hours a day writing. After that, I will then read. I write everyday of the week—except holidays. It’s what I’ve always wanted to do, be an author. Now I’m doing just that.

What book from The Living Reminder was your favorite to write?

My favorite scene in the Living Reminder is when Elijah is talking about music with the aliens; especially when they play their songs for him and he marvels from the experience. I’ve always believed music to be a universal language, a universal joy that everyone from any walk of life can appreciate.

Do you have a motto, quote, or philosophy you live by?

As for philosophy, all I say is to try and be more understanding of others. I try and see things through others eyes, and try not to be judgmental. Everyone has his or her own thinking, their own interests, and I feel that if I am open to such I will have grown as a human being.

Thomas Zman is the author of the new book The Living Reminder.

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Interview with Thomas Zman, Author of The Living Reminder

What can you tell us about your new release, The Living Reminder?

Each book in my Neuphobes Series explores different aspects as to how extraterrestrials have influenced mankind during the past millennia. My latest release in this Series, The Living Reminder, explores humanity’s final chapter as to just where the catastrophic conclusion of alien intervention inevitably leads. Elijah, my protagonist, had long ago been chosen to be the Living Reminder, and my book establishes the reasoning behind this as well as humanity’s bizarre acceptance to its annihilation. Befriending extraterrestrials, after their being released from imprisonment within the Earth, Elijah and the aliens inevitably learn from one another during their journey across the universe, growing spiritually while absolving the other of past sins.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

I was inspired to becoming an author back when I was young. Whenever I read a book–especially science fiction–I would always find myself pondering changes to the story line. I had my own sense as to how the plot should unfold, how the aliens should look and behave. I incorporated that thinking into what I remembered from high school, an English class where the teacher analyzed short stories; dissecting them, extracting the theme, humanitarian travails she felt the author strived to convey. I found it all very interesting and something I wanted to do myself. And so I have.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

Childhood’s End, Arthur C. Clarke
The Stand, Steven King
War of the Worlds, H G Wells
Fantastic Voyage, Isaac Asimov
Journey to the Center of the Earth, Jules Verne

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask

If I were to host a literary talk show, I would definitely want to interview Jules Verne. Having lived nearly two centuries ago, I would ask about his childhood, and just what experiences he had during those years that inspired his writing. I’ve always felt things that have touched your life during childhood fuel your imagination–yet back in his days I would think there were not that many to do such.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

My favorite thing about writing is the evolution of the story. At first it is just a concept, an outline. But as you work on it, put it aside to think about it, then go back and work on it more and more, it evolves into something phenomenal. Writing is something you can work on even when you’re not sitting in front of the computer. I tend to carry around the story with me (in my head) during most of my waking hours. Many times I find myself jotting down notes when I’m in the midst of doing other things. Yes, I am a daydreamer.

What is a typical day like for you?

My typical day consists of waking up before sunrise, making myself coffee, then watching about an hour of television: news, financial stuff, old westerns. I’m a channel surfer. I then make my way into my study (Thought Chamber, I like to call it) and troll around on the Internet for a bit. After that, I get serious and pick up on where I left off the following evening with whatever project I’m currently working on. I’ll write for a couple hours, then go and have breakfast, do some chores around the house, around the yard, run errands out to stores here and there–all this happening usually before lunch. This leaves the remainder of my day, into the evening, open for my writing. Depending on how far I am into a project, what point I’m at either developing plot or editing content, I’ll spend a minimum of 2 hours, sometimes as many as 12 hours a day writing. After that, I will then read. I write everyday of the week—except holidays. It’s what I’ve always wanted to do, be an author. Now I’m doing just that.

What book from The Living Reminder was your favorite to write?

My favorite scene in the Living Reminder is when Elijah is talking about music with the aliens; especially when they play their songs for him and he marvels from the experience. I’ve always believed music to be a universal language, a universal joy that everyone from any walk of life can appreciate.

Do you have a motto, quote, or philosophy you live by?

As for philosophy, all I say is to try and be more understanding of others. I try and see things through others eyes, and try not to be judgmental. Everyone has his or her own thinking, their own interests, and I feel that if I am open to such I will have grown as a human being.

Thomas Zman is the author of the new book The Living Reminder.

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Interview with Bella Di Corte, Author of Machiavellian

What can you tell us about your new release, Machiavellian?

It’s mafia romance with an epic love story at its center. Mari has had a hard life, and she’s hoping to be saved from it, even though she’s one of the strongest characters I’ve ever written. Mac has been hardened by life, too, and he needs saving in his own way. Together, they form something really beautiful. Most of my books are about redemption, and from it, how love can transform the story. Machiavellian is a perfect example of that.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

The beauty of words inspired me to become an author. I love words and how they have the power to transport us to different worlds. We can live vicariously through experiences we’ve never had before, but also reconnect with situations that feel personal because we have experienced them before. It’s the magic behind storytelling.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

This is hard! The Godfather (Mario Puzo), Romeo and Juliet (Shakespeare), Outlander (Diana Gabaldon), The Touched Series (Lashell Collins), Stephanie Plum (Janet Evanovich).

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask

Anne Rice. We’re both from New Orleans. I’d love to ask her if she feels some of her creative inspiration comes from there.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

Being transported to another world for a little while. Escapism at its best. I write like a reader would read—I go into the story with a general idea of what the book is, but having no clue what’s going to take place once I’m inside. If I plot ahead of time, like some authors do, the story feels done to me and I can’t write it. When I sit down to write, I get butterflies, because I have no idea what kind of journey the story is going to take me on.

What is a typical day like for you?

I do the usual things—eat, cook, spend time with family—with writing coming in between. Then I try to get straight writing time in at night.

What book from Machiavellian was your favorite to write?

When Mac and Mari go to Italy to meet Mac’s family. I fell even deeper in love with the two of them! Italy becomes a crucial part of their story, a turning point. Mari is finally getting what she needs from life, and Mac is finally softening just enough to let someone else in.

Do you have a motto, quote, or philosophy you live by?

Just a word. Love.

Bella Di Corte is the author of the new book Machiavellian.

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Interview with Steven F. Freeman, Author of Supertide

What can you tell us about your new release, Supertide?

: It’s a breath of fresh air, a disaster thriller that keeps the best elements of the genre and discards the clichés. The pace is strong out of the gate and accelerates as the story progresses. The story is told from the point of view of not only the main character but also from people living (or dying) through the tragedy.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

My mom and sister. They’d been “encouraging” (bugging) me to write for years. Once my daughter acquired her driver’s license, my taxi services were no longer needed and my schedule at last accommodated writing. I took a flyer on penning a thriller and discovered I loved it.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

Gosh, it’s hard to narrow down, but here’s my list: David Copperfield (Charles Dickens), Kiss the Girls (James Patterson), The Complete Sherlock Holmes (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle), The Foundation Series (Isaac Asimov), All Creatures Great and Small (James Herriot)

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask

Assuming I could invite anyone living or dead, I’d interview Charles Dickens. I would ask to what extent his characters were inspired by actual people he knew versus his imagination. His ability to present a cast of believable characters who are easy to love or hate is a hallmark I strive to emulate in my own books.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

Unlike the real world, when writing I’m constrained only by my imagination. The best part of writing is creating a story that evokes a strong reaction from the reader, even though the reader knows it’s fiction. Accomplishing that is a thrill.

What is a typical day like for you?

It varies quite a bit. I have a “day job” as a manager at a tech company, so on workdays, I’ll often wrap up and turn immediately to writing. On weekends and holidays, I’ll often settle down to write not long after breakfast. This schedule isn’t inviolate, but by using it, I’ve managed to crank out one or two books a year.

What book from Supertide was your favorite to write?

Definitely the climax. I don’t want to spoil my own book, but delivering the epic disaster in a disaster novel is a blast to write…the payoff the reader has been expecting.

Do you have a motto, quote, or philosophy you live by?

Definitely: “regret avoidance.” This means giving deep thought to the choices we face today in order to avoid regret later. It’s a theme I’ve weaved into several of my books.

Steven F. Freeman is the author of the new book Supertide.

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Interview with Hammer Trollkin, Author of Battle for Earth: Journal One

What can you tell us about your new release, Battle for Earth: Journal One?

The book is an exciting mix of Science Fiction and Fantasy with plenty of twists and turns along the way. I tried very hard to add some new concepts and storytelling techniques to make the book just a little unique.

This first book in the series has a young adult feel, though the storyline in general should be compelling to a broad age range. The principal narrator and the main characters are teenagers at the time of the alien invasion. As the series progresses and the characters age, the young adult feel will shift a bit.

I made sure to incorporate plenty of action as the Shockwave world-building develops. Come, explore the worlds of Hammer Trollkin. 🙂

What or who inspired you to become an author?

The inspiration comes from my grandchildren and many years observing the general state of planet Earth.

As a child, it was easy to daydream, to become immersed in make-believe worlds of my own construct. Perceptive grownups no-doubt thought, that child has an overactive imagination. Alas, the dreams all faded away as the realities of life settled in. I’m sure something like that happens to most people. Responsibilities. But, no kidding, my grandchildren reignited the spark. All those imaginary worlds rattling around in my head had to find a way out. What better way than to become an author? There are so many worlds to explore, and what fun, my readers can come along if they want.

Then, there’s the state of the world around us. The world can be a wonderful place. It can also be lousy. We all face our share of heartache and trouble. It’s nice to catch glimpses of hope in the midst of hardships.

Somewhere along the line I felt a nudge to write a book series that would shine a little light at the darkness. We all want good to triumph over evil, right? Throughout the book series there is plenty of conflict, at every level. Just like in the real world. Conflict usually does have a way of resolution. And moving along through such an experience, even in a book, can bring actual encouragement. It can bring hope. I hope.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

That’s a hard question. Only five? I’ll focus on works of fiction. The Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan. The Stormlight Archives by Brandon Sanderson has been good so far. Let’s include Ender’s Game; 1984; The Puppet Masters. Ughhh, it really is a hard question.

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask

I’m probably not allowed to use a time machine? Then, let’s talk to Brandon Sanderson. I’d ask about his technique for world building.

Do you formulate your worlds ahead of time, in intricate detail?  Or, do the worlds form even as you are writing about them?

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

Writing, for me, is fun, and it’s liberating. I suppose it’s cathartic. I can sit at the keyboard, and, just write. Most often a book scene will flow without the need for any sort of concentration. It just happens. I’m set free. That doesn’t necessarily mean what pours out from the keyboard is good writing. I hope it is, most of the time.

What is a typical day like for you?

These days, writing is my business as well as my hobby. I get up fairly early; have breakfast while going through emails and such. Then I write throughout the day. I do take breaks in order to stretch and take in some exercise. Our dog is kind enough to take my wife and I on a good long walk most days. I’ll usually have opportunity to write into the late afternoon. By that time my imagination supply is exhausted and it’s time for some chores; a bit of gardening perhaps. There are opportunities for some civic minded work too, such as being involved in our local youth center. It’s good to stay a little busy. I think I might have a type-A personality.

What book from Battle for Earth: Journal One was your favorite to write?

The alien invaders have finally figured out there is one special operations team that is threatening their entire invasion plan. Shockwave. The High Queen of the Invasion orders a commando raid to take out the team. I had opportunity in the scene to focus on one team member in a desperate fight to save one of his friends. There is despair as the rest of the team returns to find their base of operations destroyed with no chance of anyone surviving. Not even Para could have survived that! Are they actually dead and gone? The scene also provides a focal point from which we learn that not all of the invaders are evil monsters. Some had actually tried to help us.

Do you have a motto, quote, or philosophy you live by?

Yes, though it may be a little more try-to-live-by than always-live-by.

Do to others as you would have them do to you.

The Golden Rule. It’s remarkable in that it is so action oriented. Do to others. The philosophy of Jesus is like that. Action oriented love. Love one another…

Hammer Trollkin is the author of the new book Battle for Earth: Journal One.

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Interview with Lauren Blakely, author of Dear Sexy Ex-Boyfriend

What can you tell us about your new release, Dear Sexy Ex-Boyfriend?

Dear Sexy Ex-Boyfriend is a book you can escape into right now and it is a romp of a sexy rom-com that includes a hilarious fake fiancé situation, a friends to lovers romance, a charming British hero falling for his best friend, and, an “incident” on a Swan boat in Central Park, as well as a cookie-making class. What more could anyone want!

What’s the last book you read?

The last book I read is Slash by Laurelin Paige. It’s coming out soon and it is a deep, complex, sexy, and insightful meditation on the complexities of being a woman, pm desire, and of letting yourself have what you really want. I highly recommend it.

If Dear Sexy Ex-Boyfriend is turned into a movie, who would you pick to play the main characters?

Tom Ellis would be absolutely fantastic as Oliver and I love Anna Kendrick for almost any of my heroines!

What’s on your writing desk at the moment?

On my writing desk at the moment is a lovely citrus smelling candle given to me by one of my favorite people, the narrator for this book, Shane East, as well as a notebook of mine with cartoon illustrations of cats as astronauts, and photos of my dogs.

What’s rocking your world this month?

I’ll be writing a book soon as a joint project with one of my absolute favorite writers (details to come) and I am planning some fantastic new audiobook productions.

What scene in Dear Sexy Ex-Boyfriend was your favorite to write?

I love the scene at Gin Joint narrated by Oliver when he’s interacting with all of his guy friends, including Logan and Fitz and they all talk about their “bangable celebrity list.” It’s a fun, bawdy, bro banter type of conversation with some guy friends — two are straight and one is gay and they all have fun laughing with each other.

Lauren Blakely is the author of the new book Dear Sexy Ex-Boyfriend.

Connect with Lauren Blakely

Author Website

Facebook

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The post Interview with Lauren Blakely, author of Dear Sexy Ex-Boyfriend appeared first on NewInBooks.

New Mystery and Thriller Books to Read | June 30

Hold on to the edge of your seat as we hunt for clues and solve the case with these exciting new mystery and thriller books for the week! There are so many bestselling authors with new novels for you to dive into this week including Steven F. Freemanm Jules Adrienn, B.A. Paris, Riley Sagar, and many more. Enjoy your new mystery, thriller, and suspense novels. Happy reading!



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The post New Mystery and Thriller Books to Read | June 30 appeared first on NewInBooks.