Interview with Mark Rosendorf, Author of The Witches of Vegas

What can you tell us about your new release, The Witches of Vegas?

The Witches of Vegas offers a new take on the witches and vampire genre. Isis Rivera is a teenage witch and adopted daughter of The Witches of Vegas. They, along with their vampire mentor, Luther, openly and actively practice their power as they train to fend off a potential threat to the entire world. They do this by hiding in plain sight…as magicians on the Vegas strip. They quickly become the number one show in Las Vegas and one the other local magicians can’t possibly compete.

Zack Galloway is the teenage nephew and magician’s assistant to the last remaining magic show in Las Vegas: The Herb Galloway show. As the Witches’ success continues, Herb and Zack are one bad audience away from losing their theater and ending up homeless. When Herb and Zack are offered a chance to destroy the witches’ show forever. Although what it will take for that to happen goes against all their morals and principles as magicians, they are also desperate. They are left with little choice.

Regarding Luther, he has been training generations of witches for hundreds of years, preparing them for that threat he knows could come at any time. When it arrives, it will be up to Isis and Zack, even though they should be rivals, to bring their families together and combat this threat…if it isn’t already too late.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

Writing was something I always knew I wanted to do. As a child, I had a wild imagination, especially when playing with my toys. I used to create worlds which were detailed and followed a story that would continue each time I laid on the floor and played.

I was in the seventh grade when I knew writing was in my future. My social studies teacher gave us an assignment to interview a grandparent and then write up their story. Unfortunately, my grandparents had a 1960s sitcom ability to turn every single topic into an argument…and they both hit below the belt. The fact that they were married for 70 years is perhaps the eighth wonder of the world. I did take a shot at the assignment; I asked my grandfather to tell me about his life growing up during the depression. He told me about the girl from Ohio he wished he’d married instead of the woman he did marry. My grandmother jumped on the line and, of course, they ended up arguing. Even as I hung up the phone, they were still yelling at each other on the line.

I sat down and made up a story about my grandfather. In the story, I explained how, during the depression of the 1920’s, he left home at fourteen years old and survived by carrying bundles of hay for a nickel an hour. I talked about how he managed to save one nickel every other hour, which he used to open a business and become successful. Then he met my grandmother, and it was love at first sight. They settled down and lived happily ever after.

None of that was necessarily true, but my teacher loved the story. He gave it an “A” and asked me if I would bring my grandparents to school so they could talk about their lives and take questions from the class. Picturing what a disaster that would have been, I did some quick damage control and explained that my grandparents wouldn’t be able to make it.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

Wow, narrowing a book list to five may be the hardest question for me in this interview. But, let me take a shot…my top five books:

Number one on my list would have to be “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” by Douglas Adams. I found the story clever, funny, and well told. Not to mention, so many of the lines are quotable. The sequel, “Restaurant at the end of the galaxy” was just as good, if not even better. After that, the sequels started to drop in quality, but I’ve reread the first two books many times. (Truth be told, I’ve gone through both books twice before realizing that one of the main character’s name was NOT Ford Perfect).

My next book is “The Time Machine” by HG Wells. The concept of traveling through time and witnessing the future is every fiction writer’s dream.

Stephen Baxter wrote a direct sequel to “The Time Machine” titled “The Time Ships.” It was one of the first non-classics I remember reading. It had short chapters and each one ended with a cliffhanger. It was a book that inspired me to become a writer.

This is a short story, not a book, but it still belongs on my list: “A Sound of Thunder” by Ray Bradberry. It is the original classic that displays The Butterfly Effect, which is one of my favorite fictional concepts. It’s based on the idea that if one event in time gets changed, over the course of a long period of time, everything changes. It’s a subject discussed in many philosophy classes and among fiction writers all over the world.

For the fifth and final book on this list, there are so many to choose from…but I’m betting the one that I would find the most inspiring hasn’t been written yet. Perhaps one of the aspiring authors reading this interview will be the one the next book I can’t put down and will want to read over and over again.

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask

If I could have any guest I want, I’d want to interview William Shakespeare. The reason is not just the fact that his writing intrigues me, but he had an interesting life and a unique mind. For starters, he was an informant for Queen Elizabeth I. He also got away with having two wives by convincing the public that one of them was his daughter. Now, I’m not condoning or impressed by such behavior, but I’d love to get to know the mind that could come up with such a plot and pull it off to the point that no one figured out the truth until long after he was dead.

Add to this, that same mind actually invented words in his writing that are used in everyday English today. “Excitement,” “eyeball,” “bedroom,” “critic,” and “compromise,” are just a few of the words Shakespeare created and used in such a way that they became accepted as part of the English language. Yeah, I’d definitely a brain I’d like to engage.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

The best part of writing is being able to use it as an outlet for all my creativity. Fantasy worlds and events travel through my head, especially in the middle of the night, and they practically take me over. Writing them and turning them into stories such as The Witches of Vegas allows me to not only release these stories from my brain, but I get to bring them to the world. It’s a lot of work but if they bring entertainment to some readers out there, then it’s all worth it.

What is a typical day like for you?

My typical day has changed since COVID-19. It used to start off by taking a shower, getting dressed and driving to work. Then, coming home, going to the gym, eating dinner with my wife and then we’d watch TV. In the time I had free, I’d work on my writing or play on the internet. My typical Saturday evening with my wife involved having dinner out and bringing home Red Mango yogurt which we would eat while watching a movie.

Now that I work from home until further notice, my schedule has changed. I still wake up and take my shower but now I take a walk to get breakfast since I won’t be able to go to the gym later in the evening. I also sit in front of the computer a lot more since that’s also my workstation. Dinner and Red Mango yogurt still happens on Saturdays, except dinner must be ordered in. Now, we are at the point we can eat out, and by out, I mean outside the restaurants.

The one good thing that has come from this is I’ve had a lot more time for my writing. The Witches of Vegas was completed ahead of schedule and I’ve also finished and submitted the sequel. It also helped that my editor and members of the publishing company were all also quarantined at home.

What scene from The Witches of Vegas was your favorite to write?

Let me share a little tidbit about me. I am a former magician. I performed during my college years and a bit afterwards. Today, as a high school guidance counselor in NYC’s special education district, I share my knowledge of magic with my students as part of the school’s Performing Arts program.

I mention this because it speaks to the scenes I had the most run writing: One was teen magician, Zack Galloway, watching The Witches of Vegas’ show and trying to figure out how the tricks were done. Even with all of his experience, he is unable to figure out their tricks…mainly because he has no idea they’re using actual witchcraft to accomplish the feats on stage.

The second scene was Zack discussing magic with Isis. Figuring she’s not only a magician like him but a performer in the top magic show in all of Vegas, he uses certain terminology related to magic such as “misdirection” and “Rabbit box,” yet Isis has no idea what those words mean. It leaves Zack confused how she wouldn’t know standard industry lingo.

Do you have a motto, quote, or philosophy you live by?

“Life is like the weather. No matter how good or bad it may seem, don’t get too comfortable because it could change at any point.” — Mark Rosendorf

Mark Rosendorf is the author of the new book The Witches of Vegas.

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Interview with E.G. Radcliff, Author of The Last Prince

What can you tell us about your new release, The Last Prince?

The Last Prince is a prequel to The Hidden King, and tells the story of Ninian, Áed’s partner. Overall, it is a very character-driven story–there are no dragons or grizzled monsters, quests or evil empires; instead, it’s a story of growth and self-discovery laced with fae magic and the beautiful, dangerous journey of trusting another. From the violence of the city streets to the quiet moments between partners, The Last Prince is made of trauma and healing, folklore and family.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

I like this question, because the answer is… amusing to me. Being inspired to become an author implies that I chose to become an author, when in reality, it was something that just had to happen. I wrote a book because I liked writing; I decided to self-publish because I didn’t want so much work to gather dust, and I fulfilled that decision with the love, support, and hard work of an awful lot of different people. Inspiration for my writing comes from everywhere and anywhere; I keep lists of tiny things that catch my eye, whether I’m at the hardware store or in the woods, and I observe the people around me to understand how my characters can function. So in that regard… I’ve been inspired to be an author by everyone I’ve ever met, and everything I’ve ever seen.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

It’s a strange list, I think. These are the books that I thought best because they were the most engaging, and of which I have tried to emulate certain facets, so they aren’t sorted by genre, number in a series, or even age group; middle grade can exist alongside adult nonfiction, and I’ll love them just the same.
The Once and Future King
A Court of Wings and Ruin
A Pilgrim at Tinker Creek
The Night Circus
A Storm of Swords

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask

I assume the guest should be an author, and not a researcher of whatever subject has caught my fascination that week, but I’m going to pick someone who’s not alive, because the rules didn’t say I couldn’t. Probably T.H. White, author of The Once and Future King and The Book of Merlyn–his books obviously fall outside of the genre I typically write, but from his worldbuilding to his dialogue–which is so subtly, brilliantly executed that one can discern which character is speaking without a single dialogue tag–his works are masterpieces. He’s the sort of author whose character dynamics are profoundly human, and they’re the driving force of the story, even when White uses that humanity to make statements about the nature of such vast subjects as Might versus Right.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

It’s like reading, but I get to do whatever I want. It can be cathartic, or escapist, or a way to explore my own emotions. It’s always a challenge.

What is a typical day like for you?

I make sure to write at least 1,000 words every day, ideally more, and if I have nothing I need to do, then I assign myself work that I know I’ll find fulfilling. I don’t actually do very well when I’m not juggling five hundred projects; stress keeps me sane.

What scene from The Last Prince was your favorite to write?

There is a scene in the second half which is very peaceful: Áed and Ninian simply have a moment to themselves. Though The Last Prince is more character than external scheme-driven, it does have parts that are quite heavy, and I personally relished the chance to let Áed and Ninian relax and be happy for a little while.

Do you have a motto, quote, or philosophy you live by?

I suppose that the philosophy I try hardest to live by is ‘forgive me my humanity’. I, like everyone, sometimes fail to live up to my own standards, and self-forgiveness isn’t one of my strengths–not when I want so very, very badly to be a good person. So sometimes, I need to remind myself that I’m human, imperfect by definition, and that it’s okay. So long as I don’t give up trying to do the right thing, I am allowed to make mistakes. This helps build compassion for myself, which I need, but also for other people; if I can work past failings in my own actions, then I can forgive those who, like me, try and sometimes do not succeed.

E.G. Radcliff is the author of the new book The Last Prince.

Connect with E.G. Radcliff
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Facebook

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New Science Fiction and Fantasy Books | August 11

Set off on an adventure to new worlds this week! This selection of new science fiction and fantasy books will surely please! Science Fiction fans should be excited about the latest from bestselling authors Andy Peloquin, Rick Partlow, Bruce Sterling, and more. If Fantasy is what your library needs, you’ll be able to pick up the latest from E.G. Radcliff, Mark Rosendorf, Martha Carr, and more. Enjoy your new science fiction and fantasy books. Happy reading!


Fantasy


Science Fiction


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The Best New Fantasy Novels | August 2020

The Best New Fantasy Novels | August 2020

Have you been searching everywhere for the best new fantasy novels for your reading list?
You’ll find your next favorite read among these latest releases from E.G. Radcliff, M.D. Massey, Mark Rosendorf, Laurell K. Hamilton, James Maxwell, and Shannon Mayer.


The Last Prince

by E.G. Radcliff

Release Date: August 6, 2020

The second book in The Coming of Áed Series by E.G. Radcliff… Robbed of his childhood by tragedy and betrayal and forced onto the streets, only fury makes young Ninian feel whole. In a world of gangs and fae, he is more than willing to fight for his life. But by the time a desperate Ninian realizes he’s crossed the wrong person, it is much, much too late.

Buy on Amazon

Druid Arcane

by M.D. Massey

Release Date: July 31, 2020

The 11th book in The Colin McCool Paranormal Suspense Series by M.D. Massey… I thought that learning magic from a druid master was tough, but that was before I started taking lessons from an insane quasi-god. For six long months, I’ve been under the tutelage of Click, working on my magic skills so I can survive the wrath of several Celtic gods and find a cure for my druid mentor, Finnegas.

Buy on Amazon

The Witches of Vegas

by Mark Rosendorf

Release Date: August 5, 2020

By using their magic, the Witches of Vegas become the number one act performing on the Las Vegas Strip—a great achievement for them, but not so much for the magicians—who can’t possibly keep pace. Isis Rivera is the adopted fifteen-year-old daughter of The Witches of Vegas. Zack Galloway is the nephew and assistant to the last magician in the city. They should be rivals but they must work together to save sin city from a four-hundred-year-old witch with a grudge against humanity.

Buy on Amazon

Sucker Punch

by Laurell K. Hamilton

Release Date: August 4, 2020

The 27th book in the Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter Series by New York Times Bestselling Author Laurell K. Hamilton… When a fellow U.S. Marshal asks Anita Blake to fly to a tiny community in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, she knows time is running short. When she arrives, there is plenty of proof that a young wereleopard killed his uncle in the most gruesome and bloody way possible.

Buy on Amazon

A World of Secrets

by James Maxwell

Release Date: July 16, 2020

The second book in The Firewall Trilogy by bestselling author James Maxwell… In a world of secrets, Taimin and Selena are desperate for answers. They need to discover the truth about their origins and the firewall that borders the wasteland. If they don’t find the hidden path they seek, the citizens of Zorn will die.

Buy on Amazon

Midlife Demon Hunter

by Shannon Mayer

Release Date: July 14, 2020

The third book in The Forty Proof Series by USA Today Bestselling Author Shannon Mayer… Ousted from the Hollows Group, the shadow world has officially taken notice of me. With loan sharks sniffing around and knocking on my door, I need to figure out how my ex-husband pushed all his debt onto me, because it stinks of black magic and back-alley dealings.

Buy on Amazon

The post The Best New Fantasy Novels | August 2020 appeared first on NewInBooks.

How I Wrote A Novel During the Pandemic by M.D. Massey

Writing a novel is one of the most daunting tasks a writer can attempt. All those words, all those pages, not to mention handling plots and sub-plots, pacing and dialogue, character development and themes—it’s enough to make you lose your hair, and I’m somewhat of an expert on that topic. Yet, finishing a novel is an achievement I would list among the most satisfying I’ve experienced in my nearly five decades of existence.

Prior to the pandemic, I’d written and published twenty urban fantasy and paranormal suspense novels, novellas, and short story collections. In fact, I’d just released the tenth novel in my Colin McCool urban fantasy series when the lockdowns went into effect. Needless to say, the lockdown wrecked my book launch. And while I did make up the sales in the months after, at the time it felt like a major setback.

But, one can cry over spilled milk, or one can acquire more cows. I knew that sitting on my thumbs fretting over the state of the world would not help me sell a single additional copy of my novels. So, I did what every experienced author does when a book release fails to go as planned—I got to work on my next book.

The Apocalypse Novelist—Or, Avoiding Information Overwhelm

Accomplished authors all share a secret that is pivotal to their success. And that secret is, they write every day, even when they don’t feel like it. I’ve never been one to experience writer’s block, but I have to admit that after I’d logged onto my social media accounts each morning, I felt anything but a strong motivation to write.

For that reason, the first thing I did was turn all that stuff off. For starters, I stopped watching the news, and I installed a browser plugin that blocks my Facebook feed. Then, I subscribed to a few email newsletters that boil each day’s top news stories down to a few key paragraphs, resolving to scan and delete them immediately when they hit my inbox.

This forced me only to use Facebook and other social media sites for reader interaction and to conduct business. In turn, that freed me up emotionally and timewise to attend to things that mattered most. Namely, seeing to my family’s welfare and finishing my next novel.

Then I went to work.

Writing When You Don’t Feel Like Writing

As I said, writers write. They don’t waste time vacillating over whether they should write, or complaining about writer’s block, or talking with the other writers in their writing group about how they’d finish their novel, if only they had the inspiration.

Instead, they sit down at their writing desks at the same time every day, and they write until they hit their goal for that day, be it a set period of time at the keys, or a certain number of words, pages, or scenes. This is the daily discipline that often separates the dilettante from the career author.

Yet, there were days that I simply did not want to write, especially after we lost two of the elder members of our family to COVID. Added to that emotional burden was the fact that my novel specifically dealt with themes of loss and death. Certainly, it made the writing of said related scenes and chapters all the more poignant, but it did nothing for my desire to write them.

My solution to this challenge was to make an agreement with myself that I would at least write one scene a day, or roughly 1,000 words. That might seem like a lot to some who are reading this, but for an author who routinely writes 3,000 to 5,000 words a day, it felt like throttling my muse. That said, by committing to a bare minimum output I was able to slog through those sections that caused me the most dread, without feeling guilty for missing my daily word count.

This proved to be the most important decision I made for my mental health and sanity as I finished the novel. Making periodic progress toward my goal gave me a regular and much-needed sense of accomplishment, a small daily emotional boost that helped me get through a very rough time. Indeed, it turned out to be my saving grace.

Other Tricks for Producing When the World Stands Still

Another minor challenge I faced during this time—and I’m sure other work-at-home parents can relate—was having my family home with me around the clock during the lockdowns. Thankfully my wife is an essential worker, and I am very grateful that we didn’t lose her income during this difficult time. However, with her working remotely, and my son completing his school year from home online, distractions were at an all-time high for this stay-at-home author.

To deal with that challenge, I locked myself in my office with a white noise machine running nearby, and a noise-canceling headset over my ears. Or, I’d turn up some fast and loud music and get lost in the rhythm while I worked on my novel. Both techniques served to drown out any background noise so that I wouldn’t break concentration during my scheduled daily writing sessions.

Additionally, during that time I experienced increased pressure from my “day job” as a small business consultant. I’ve run my consulting firm for years as a one-person show, and as you can imagine, my clients faced significant financial challenges after the lockdowns commenced. So, I had to increase the service and support I typically provided, all while continuing to make progress on my book.

How did I balance this? I dedicated specific time to each endeavor, and I made sure that I never allowed one to interfere with the other. Doing so prevented me from getting too distracted by my day job responsibilities to finish writing my novel.

The Final Outcome?

I’ve seen writers boasting on social media about how they used the lockdown to crank out twice as much work as before. I have about as much regard for those writers as I do for the social media influencers who encouraged their followers to learn a new language or get a degree during the lockdown. In dire times such as these, I see their admonishments as tone-deaf humble-bragging that serves no one but those who post such nonsense.

So, I’m not about to boast about my accomplishment, as it certainly took me longer to write this novel than any I’d written over the last three years. Yet, finish it I did, despite facing some personal and emotional obstacles that could’ve easily derailed the project. Druid Arcane releases July 31st, and I’m hoping that this launch goes much better than the last.

But if not, I know what I’ll be doing come August—namely, working on my next novel.

M.D. Massey is the author of the new book Druid Arcane.

Connect with M.D:
Author Website

 Twitter

Buy The Book
B08CY9LCZM cover image

Buy The Book

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The post How I Wrote A Novel During the Pandemic by M.D. Massey appeared first on NewInBooks.

How I Wrote A Novel During the Pandemic by M.D. Massey

Writing a novel is one of the most daunting tasks a writer can attempt. All those words, all those pages, not to mention handling plots and sub-plots, pacing and dialogue, character development and themes—it’s enough to make you lose your hair, and I’m somewhat of an expert on that topic. Yet, finishing a novel is an achievement I would list among the most satisfying I’ve experienced in my nearly five decades of existence.

Prior to the pandemic, I’d written and published twenty urban fantasy and paranormal suspense novels, novellas, and short story collections. In fact, I’d just released the tenth novel in my Colin McCool urban fantasy series when the lockdowns went into effect. Needless to say, the lockdown wrecked my book launch. And while I did make up the sales in the months after, at the time it felt like a major setback.

But, one can cry over spilled milk, or one can acquire more cows. I knew that sitting on my thumbs fretting over the state of the world would not help me sell a single additional copy of my novels. So, I did what every experienced author does when a book release fails to go as planned—I got to work on my next book.

The Apocalypse Novelist—Or, Avoiding Information Overwhelm

Accomplished authors all share a secret that is pivotal to their success. And that secret is, they write every day, even when they don’t feel like it. I’ve never been one to experience writer’s block, but I have to admit that after I’d logged onto my social media accounts each morning, I felt anything but a strong motivation to write.

For that reason, the first thing I did was turn all that stuff off. For starters, I stopped watching the news, and I installed a browser plugin that blocks my Facebook feed. Then, I subscribed to a few email newsletters that boil each day’s top news stories down to a few key paragraphs, resolving to scan and delete them immediately when they hit my inbox.

This forced me only to use Facebook and other social media sites for reader interaction and to conduct business. In turn, that freed me up emotionally and timewise to attend to things that mattered most. Namely, seeing to my family’s welfare and finishing my next novel.

Then I went to work.

Writing When You Don’t Feel Like Writing

As I said, writers write. They don’t waste time vacillating over whether they should write, or complaining about writer’s block, or talking with the other writers in their writing group about how they’d finish their novel, if only they had the inspiration.

Instead, they sit down at their writing desks at the same time every day, and they write until they hit their goal for that day, be it a set period of time at the keys, or a certain number of words, pages, or scenes. This is the daily discipline that often separates the dilettante from the career author.

Yet, there were days that I simply did not want to write, especially after we lost two of the elder members of our family to COVID. Added to that emotional burden was the fact that my novel specifically dealt with themes of loss and death. Certainly, it made the writing of said related scenes and chapters all the more poignant, but it did nothing for my desire to write them.

My solution to this challenge was to make an agreement with myself that I would at least write one scene a day, or roughly 1,000 words. That might seem like a lot to some who are reading this, but for an author who routinely writes 3,000 to 5,000 words a day, it felt like throttling my muse. That said, by committing to a bare minimum output I was able to slog through those sections that caused me the most dread, without feeling guilty for missing my daily word count.

This proved to be the most important decision I made for my mental health and sanity as I finished the novel. Making periodic progress toward my goal gave me a regular and much-needed sense of accomplishment, a small daily emotional boost that helped me get through a very rough time. Indeed, it turned out to be my saving grace.

Other Tricks for Producing When the World Stands Still

Another minor challenge I faced during this time—and I’m sure other work-at-home parents can relate—was having my family home with me around the clock during the lockdowns. Thankfully my wife is an essential worker, and I am very grateful that we didn’t lose her income during this difficult time. However, with her working remotely, and my son completing his school year from home online, distractions were at an all-time high for this stay-at-home author.

To deal with that challenge, I locked myself in my office with a white noise machine running nearby, and a noise-canceling headset over my ears. Or, I’d turn up some fast and loud music and get lost in the rhythm while I worked on my novel. Both techniques served to drown out any background noise so that I wouldn’t break concentration during my scheduled daily writing sessions.

Additionally, during that time I experienced increased pressure from my “day job” as a small business consultant. I’ve run my consulting firm for years as a one-person show, and as you can imagine, my clients faced significant financial challenges after the lockdowns commenced. So, I had to increase the service and support I typically provided, all while continuing to make progress on my book.

How did I balance this? I dedicated specific time to each endeavor, and I made sure that I never allowed one to interfere with the other. Doing so prevented me from getting too distracted by my day job responsibilities to finish writing my novel.

The Final Outcome?

I’ve seen writers boasting on social media about how they used the lockdown to crank out twice as much work as before. I have about as much regard for those writers as I do for the social media influencers who encouraged their followers to learn a new language or get a degree during the lockdown. In dire times such as these, I see their admonishments as tone-deaf humble-bragging that serves no one but those who post such nonsense.

So, I’m not about to boast about my accomplishment, as it certainly took me longer to write this novel than any I’d written over the last three years. Yet, finish it I did, despite facing some personal and emotional obstacles that could’ve easily derailed the project. Druid Arcane releases July 31st, and I’m hoping that this launch goes much better than the last.

But if not, I know what I’ll be doing come August—namely, working on my next novel.

M.D. Massey is the author of the new book Druid Arcane.

Connect with M.D:
Author Website

 Twitter

Buy The Book
B08CY9LCZM cover image

Buy The Book

Sign up for our email and we’ll send you the best new books in your favorite genres weekly.

The post How I Wrote A Novel During the Pandemic by M.D. Massey appeared first on NewInBooks.

New Science Fiction and Fantasy Books | August 4

Set off on an adventure to new worlds this week! This selection of new science fiction and fantasy books will surely please! Science Fiction fans should be excited about the latest from bestselling authors Charles Tillman, Michael Anderle, Craig Alanson, and more. If Fantasy is what your library needs, you’ll be able to pick up the latest from M.D. Massey, J.F. Penn, Laurell K. Hamilton, and more. Enjoy your new science fiction and fantasy books. Happy reading!


Fantasy


Science Fiction


Sign up for our email and we’ll send you the best new books in your favorite genres weekly.

The post New Science Fiction and Fantasy Books | August 4 appeared first on NewInBooks.

New Science Fiction and Fantasy Books | July 28

Set off on an adventure to new worlds this week! This selection of new science fiction and fantasy books will surely please! Science Fiction fans should be excited about the latest from bestselling authors Michael Anderle, Ian Doescher, Christopher Ruocchio, and more. If Fantasy is what your library needs, you’ll be able to pick up the latest from R.A. Salvatore, Steven Brust, Faith Hunter, and more. Enjoy your new science fiction and fantasy books. Happy reading!


Fantasy


Science Fiction


Sign up for our email and we’ll send you the best new books in your favorite genres weekly.

The post New Science Fiction and Fantasy Books | July 28 appeared first on NewInBooks.

The Buzziest Books of July | 2020

The Buzziest Books of July | 2020

The month of July was a great time for readers with a host of exciting releases from bestselling authors. There were so many page-turning novels that captivated us from cover to cover this month. If you want to catch up on the books everyone was talking about, here are our choices for the buzziest books of July. Happy reading!


Sex and Vanity

by Kevin Kwan

Release Date: June 30, 2020

“Deliciously modern… drama, diamonds, and satire galore.—Vanity Fair. Sex and Vanity is the new novel from the New York Times Bestselling Author fo Crazy Rich Asians… A glittering tale of a young woman torn between two men: The fiance of her family’s dreams and George Zao, the man she is desperately trying not to fall in love with.

Buy on Amazon

The Dilemma

by B. A. Paris

Release Date: June 30, 2020

The new novel from the New York Times Bestselling Author of Behind Closed Doors… It is Livia’s 40th birthday and she is being thrown the party of a lifetime by her husband, Adam. He wanted to make up for the wedding they never had. Everyone she loves will be there… except her daughter Marnie, who is studying abroad. Livia is secretly glad she won’t be there because she recently discovered a secret about her that if revealed, will shake the foundation of the family to its core.

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Under Scottish Stars

by Carla Laureano

Release Date: July 7, 2020

The third book in The MacDonald Family Trilogy by RITA Award-Winning Author Carla Laureano… Recently widowed Serena MacDonald Stewart has been focussing on her children to the exclusion of her career, her art, and her sanity. She soon gets an opportunity to dust off her long-ignored business skills and have a fresh start, when her brother asks her to oversee the family guest house on the Isle of Skye. But any hopes of a smooth transition are dashed when she meets the hotel manager, Malcolm Blake.

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Peace Talks

by Jim Butcher

Release Date: July 14, 2020

The 16th book in the Dresden Files by New York Times Bestselling Author Jim Butcher… The Supernatural nations of the world are negotiating an end to ongoing hostilities. Chicago’s only professional wizard, Harry Dresden, has joined the White Council’s security team to make sure that the talks stay civil. But when dark political manipulations threaten the existence of Chicago, can he succeed?

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Billionaire Undercover

by J.S. Scott

Release Date: July 7, 2020

The fifteenth book in The Billionaire’s Obsession Series by New York Times Bestselling Author J.S. Scott… After I was kidnapped while doing a geographical exploration, I thought I was destined to die in a foreign country. But then a mysterious rescuer showed up just in time to save my life. Unfortunately, my liberator is also the co-CEO of Montgomery Mining… my employer. He is definitely a billionaire with an attitude.

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Never Ask Me

by Jeff Abbott

Release Date: July 14, 2020

The body of Danielle Roberts is found on a park bench in a quiet neighborhood of the wealthy Austin suburb of Lakehaven. She was a beloved member of the community and an adoption consultant who delivered the joy of parenthood to many local families. Her murder shocks the community. No one is as crushed as the Pollitts, the family who lived two houses down from Danielle. Her death becomes a maelstrom of suspicion and intrigue.

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Beautiful Prison

by Michael Lechner

Release Date: June 26, 2020

This is a story of a family suffering from domestic abuse by a manipulative and abusive father who isolates them in the wild and untamed Idahoan Mountains. This true story portrays the lessons learned from the eyes of childhood emotional neglect and how the eight siblings survived and found their way back from surviving the forest. It also explores how one mother discovers all that’s wrong with the toxic events that led to the ultimate survival of her children and why life is not supposed to be this way.

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Solar Fury

by E.A. Chance

Release Date: June 16, 2020

The first book in the post-apocalyptic Shattered Sunlight Series by E.A. Chance… Navigating life with PTSD is not easy for the young widowed surgeon, Riley Poole. When a global solar flare strikes and destroys the power grid, she is stranded in Washington D.C. with her teenage daughter. In a world gone mad, it will take near superhuman courage to find safe harbor. Along with quirky cardiologist Coop, Riley will have to traverse hundreds of miles of frozen terrain to get her daughter to safety.

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The post The Buzziest Books of July | 2020 appeared first on NewInBooks.

Bestsellers Now in Paperback | July 2020

Take a look at this month’s selection of bestsellers now in paperback! July had a great selection of bestselling books to check out from thrilling mysteries to enthralling literary reads, and insightful biographies. Pick up these latest paperback books by bestselling authors John Grisham, J.D> Robb, Clive Cussler, Karin SlaughterKevin Kwan, Brandon Sanderson, and many more!


Mystery, Thriller & Suspense


Literary Fiction


Fantasy & Science Fiction


Young Adult


Biography & Memoir

The post Bestsellers Now in Paperback | July 2020 appeared first on NewInBooks.