New Books to Read in Literary Fiction | March 2

Literary fiction readers are in for a treat. This week’s latest releases list is full of intriguing reads you won’t want to miss! The new releases list includes so many bestselling authors like Danielle Steel, Lauren Willig, Sister Souljah, and many more. Enjoy your new literary fiction books. Happy reading!



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The Buzziest Books of February | 2021

The Buzziest Books of February | 2021

The month of February was a great time for readers with a host of exciting releases from bestselling authors. There were so many page-turning novels that captivated us from cover to cover this month. If you want to catch up on the books everyone was talking about, here are our choices for the buzziest books of February. Happy reading!


The Four Winds

by Kristin Hannah

Release Date: February 2, 2021

Texas, 1921. A time of abundance. The Great War is over, the bounty of the land is plentiful, and America is on the brink of a new and optimistic era. But for Elsa Wolcott, deemed too old to marry in a time when marriage is a woman’s only option, the future seems bleak. Until the night she meets Rafe Martinelli and decides to change the direction of her life. With her reputation in ruin, there is only one respectable choice: marriage to a man she barely knows. By 1934, the world has changed; millions are out of work and drought has devastated the Great Plains.

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The Survivors

by Jane Harper

Release Date: February 2, 2021

Kieran Elliott’s life changed forever on the day a reckless mistake led to devastating consequences. The guilt that still haunts him resurfaces during a visit with his young family to the small coastal community he once called home. Kieran’s parents are struggling in a town where fortunes are forged by the sea. Between them all is his absent brother, Finn. When a body is discovered on the beach, long-held secrets threaten to emerge. A sunken wreck, a missing girl, and questions that have never washed away…

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A Court of Silver Flames

by Sarah J. Maas

Release Date: February 16, 2021

The fifth book in A Court of Thorns and Roses Series by Sarah J. Maas… Nesta Archeron has always been prickly-proud, swift to anger, and slow to forgive. And ever since being forced into the Cauldron and becoming High Fae against her will, she’s struggled to find a place for herself within the strange, deadly world she inhabits. Worse, she can’t seem to move past the horrors of the war with Hybern and all she lost in it.

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The Paris Library

by Janet Skeslien Charles

Release Date: February 9, 2021

Paris, 1939: Young and ambitious Odile Souchet has it all: her handsome police officer beau and a dream job at the American Library in Paris. When the Nazis march into Paris, Odile stands to lose everything she holds dear, including her beloved library. Together with her fellow librarians, Odile joins the Resistance with the best weapons she has: books. But when the war finally ends, instead of freedom, Odile tastes the bitter sting of unspeakable betrayal.

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Good Neighbors

by Sarah Langan

Release Date: February 2, 2021

Welcome to Maple Street, a picture-perfect slice of suburban Long Island, its residents bound by their children, their work, and their illusion of safety in a rapidly changing world. But menace skulks beneath the surface of this exclusive enclave, making its residents prone to outrage. When the Wilde family moves in, they trigger their neighbors’ worst fears. Dad Arlo’s a gruff has-been rock star with track marks. Mom Gertie’s got a thick Brooklyn accent, with high heels and tube tops to match. Their weird kids cuss like sailors. They don’t fit with the way Maple Street sees itself.

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The Kindest Lie

by Nancy Johnson

Release Date: February 2, 2021

It’s 2008, and the inauguration of President Barack Obama ushers in a new kind of hope. In Chicago, Ruth Tuttle, an Ivy-League educated Black engineer, is married to a kind and successful man. He’s eager to start a family, but Ruth is uncertain. She has never gotten over the baby she gave birth to—and was forced to leave behind—when she was a teenager. She had promised her family she’d never look back, but Ruth knows that to move forward, she must make peace with the past.

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Winter’s Orbit

by Everina Maxwell

Release Date: February 2, 2021

Prince Kiem, a famously disappointing minor royal and the Emperor’s least favorite grandchild, has been called upon to be useful for once. He’s commanded to fulfill an obligation of marriage to the representative of the Empire’s newest and most rebellious vassal planet. His future husband, Count Jainan, is a widower and murder suspect.

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How to Avoid a Climate Disaster

by Bill Gates

Release Date: February 16, 2021

Bill Gates has spent a decade investigating the causes and effects of climate change. With the help of experts in the fields of physics, chemistry, biology, engineering, political science, and finance, he has focused on what must be done in order to stop the planet’s slide to certain environmental disaster. In this book, he not only explains why we need to work toward net-zero emissions of greenhouse gases, but also details what we need to do to achieve this profoundly important goal.

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Bestsellers Now in Paperback | February 2021

Take a look at this month’s selection of bestsellers now in paperback! December had a great selection of bestselling books to check out from thrilling mysteries to enthralling literary reads, and insightful biographies. Pick up these latest paperback books by bestselling authors John Grisham, Michael Connelly, James Patterson, Elin Hilderbrand, A.G. Riddle, and many more!


Mystery, Thriller & Suspense


Literary Fiction


Fantasy & Science Fiction

Young Adult


Biography & Memoir

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Books To Read For Fans of Literary Fiction | February 2021

Books To Read For Fans of Literary Fiction | February 2021

Can get enough literary fiction books for your reading list? Need some recommendations on what to read next? We’re here to help with some of our latest literary fiction recommendations from bestselling authors Steve Physioc, S. J. Cunningham, Mary Lawson, Ruth Druart, Susan Mihalic, and Julia Fine. Happy reading!


Walks With The Wind

by Steve Physioc

Release Date: February 19, 2021

Sam Cloud-Carson has a good life. He’s a budding baseball phenom who can pack the stands with scouts. He’s surrounded by a loving family. And he’s well known in his Southern Ute tribe and beyond as the best wildlife tracker anyone has ever seen – anyone, including Drake Dixon. Drake doesn’t concern himself with anything or anyone that can’t give him what he craves: money and power. His position and prestige as owner of Diamond Bar Security bring him both, but he knows young Sam can bring him even more.

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All This Was Mission

by S. J. Cunningham

Release Date: January 31, 2021

Madeline has made a lot of mistakes-in her marriage and her life-and has paid dearly for them. Her teenaged children have disowned her, her parents are disappointed and embarrassed, and her sister thinks that she needs spiritual help. Worst of all, her soon-to-be ex-husband is hell-bent on destroying her life and her relationships. When she finds herself on a plane to a mysterious tropical resort called Ashrama with a group of strangers, all with their own problems, she isn’t sure she’ll ever make it back home again.

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A Town Called Solace

by Mary Lawson

Release Date: February 16, 2021

Enter thirtyish Liam Kane, newly divorced, newly unemployed, newly arrived in this small northern town, where he promptly moves into the house next door–watched suspiciously by astonished and dismayed Clara, whose elderly friend, Mrs. Orchard, owns that home. Around the time of Rose’s disappearance, Mrs. Orchard was sent for a short stay in hospital, and Clara promised to keep an eye on the house and its remaining occupant, Mrs. Orchard’s cat, Moses.

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While Paris Slept

by Ruth Druart

Release Date: February 23, 2021

Santa Cruz, 1953. Jean-Luc is a man on the run from his past. The scar on his face is a small price to pay for surviving the horrors of Nazi occupation in France. Now, he has a new life in California, a family. He never expected the past to come knocking on his door. Paris, 1944. A young Jewish woman’s past is torn apart in a heartbeat. Herded onto a train bound for Auschwitz, in an act of desperation she entrusts her most precious possession to a stranger. All she has left now is hope.

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Dark Horses

by Susan Mihalic

Release Date: February 16, 2021

Fifteen-year-old equestrian prodigy Roan Montgomery has only ever known two worlds: inside the riding arena, and outside of it. Both, for as long as she can remember, have been ruled by her father, who demands strict obedience in all areas of her life. The warped power dynamic of coach and rider extends far beyond the stables, and Roan’s relationship with her father has long been inappropriate. She has been able to compartmentalize that dark aspect of her life.

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The Upstairs House

by Julia Fine

Release Date: February 23, 2021

Ravaged and sore from giving birth to her first child, Megan is mostly raising her newborn alone while her husband travels for work. Physically exhausted and mentally drained, she’s also wracked with guilt over her unfinished dissertation—a thesis on mid-century children’s literature. Enter a new upstairs neighbor: the ghost of quixotic children’s book writer Margaret Wise Brown—author of the beloved classic Goodnight Moon—whose existence no one else will acknowledge.

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Interview with Nina Atwood, Author of Free Fall

What can you tell us about your new release, Free Fall?

I’m super excited about it because it’s my first psychological thriller! It was inspired by a woman I personally know really well, who built and sold a great business and made a lot of money. Her story is NOT Hannah Lee’s, but what I fantasized about was this question: what if you sold a business for a lot of money and someone was paying attention, someone who did not have your best interests at heart? What if that someone found a way into your life with your money as his/her prize?

What books are currently on your night stand?

Right now I’m enraptured by Beatriz Williams’ Schuler Sisters series… historical fiction at its best! I’m so impressed by authors who can do the extensive research necessary for this genre. Not being a history buff, I doubt I’ll dabble in it as an author but I love reading it!

What advice would you give your teenage self?

Be more observant, capture your observations, and have the confidence to write in small bits and pieces, even if a coherent story isn’t possible yet. Be bold as a budding author. Most of all, believe in yourself.

If you had an extra hour each day, how would you spend it?

Is this a trick question? Of course, I would spend it writing! I truly love the art and the craft of writing… my biggest challenge is finding time since I still have a significant “day job.”

What makes your world go round? Why does it bring you joy?

My relationships – husband, Mom, amazing colleagues, and a handful of BFFs who understand and accept me, not always an easy task I’m sure! Second, my work, because my clients are all amazing people who work hard to provide jobs for others, often at the expense of their own personal pursuits. So, in nutshell, it’s the wonderful people whom I have the privilege to know, love, work with, and understand at a deep level. The joy is in the connections, the shared stories, the shared life events, the compassion, the love, the shared heartaches, and ultimately, the sense of purpose. It’s why we are here – to connect with others and to make a difference whenever possible.

What scene from Free Fall was your favorite to write?

The climactic scene. All the significant players are in one place at the same time, and all the building drama throughout the story explodes in a way that… no spoilers here, but let’s say that scene answers all the readers’ questions. It was intense writing it, for sure!!

What inspires you as an author?

The messiness of life! I’ve found people endlessly fascinating for my entire life. I remember observing the people around me as early as grade school, noticing what they said, what they did, and the irrationality of how they lived their lives. I realized early in life that if there is one overriding life principle for human beings, it is this: it’s complicated! I began writing fiction because I realized I had this very stuffed full mental file cabinet of people’s complicated stories, and many of them were my own, that I thought could be woven together in interesting plots that readers might enjoy. Ultimately, I am most inspired by the perseverance of heartfelt, courageous people to overcome life’s endless challenges, so I always endeavor to weave in those kinds of elements.

 

Nina Atwood is the author of the new book Free Fall

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Interview with Steve Physioc, Author of Walks With The Wind

What can you tell us about your new release, Walks With The Wind?

Walks with the Wind is a vision quest story about a young man from the Southern Ute Tribe in southwest Colorado. Sam Cloud-Carson has a good life. He’s a budding baseball phenom who packs the stands with scouts. He’s surrounded by a loving family. And he’s well known as the best wildlife tracker anyone has ever seen–anyone including Drake Dixon. Dixon owns a private military company and wants to use Sam’s tracking skills for his security team in war-torn Afghanistan. When the worst day in Sam’s life becomes the best day of Drake’s, their paths become impossibly intertwined in a journey across the globe–a journey with life-altering implications for them both.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

My mom, Bette, inspired me to read. She always had a book with her. I remember as a fourth-grader, sitting at her feet while she read Kenneth Roberts’ novel Arundel to me. It amazed me how someone could be so creative with their words to form these images in my mind. How did they do it? I read everything after that, particularly historical fiction, stories about the American Revolution, the birth of our nation, the Lewis and Clark adventure, the War of 1812, the history of slavery, the genocide of our Native American culture, WWI, WWII, etc. I believe my love of storytelling led me to become a baseball broadcaster. The history of the game fascinates me, and the game itself is perfect for one who loves to tell stories. It’s basically five minutes of action and three hours of conversation. I’ve been telling sports stories for 45 years, and in recent years, returned to my first love…books.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

Tough question…so many to choose from. But I’ll go with the ones that moved me as I grew up.

a) Arundel by Kenneth Roberts

b) Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

c) Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry

d) Outlander by Diana Gabaldon (entire series)

e) A Course in Miracles

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask?

Diana Gabaldon of the Outlander series. We’ve become friends, and her story about how she became a writer is fascinating. I think Diana is one of the best of our era, a true artist who writes with such passion and heart, who has that rare ability to pull her readers into the story and make them fall in love with her characters. She’s brilliant. My question…”What motivated you to write Outlander and how has Doug (her husband) inspired you in your writing?” He’s a great guy!

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

Writing about characters who want to be better. As humans, we all will face some kind of crisis in our lives. How will we handle it? What will we do? Will we grow from the experience or let it bring us down? I like writing about people, who, if they were real, I’d like to spend time with…maybe have them over for dinner…or at least a glass of wine. I think we’d be good friends.

What is a typical day like for you?

Wake up at 5 a.m. Pray. Meditate. Write. Coffee. Granola. Walk dog two miles. Stationary bike. Yoga. Write, write, write, read, read, read. Nap. Walk dog again. Go to the ballpark. Talk baseball. Come home. Do it again the next day. I’m blessed to share all of this with the woman I want to walk home to God with, my wife, Stace.

What scene from Walks With The Wind was your favorite to write?

So many. Sam’s scenes with his sister, Jenny. Pitching in college. Tracking in the wild of Afghanistan.

Do you have a motto, quote, or philosophy you live by?

“If you knew who walked beside you on a path that you have chosen, fear would be impossible.” – A Course in Miracles


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Interview with SJ Cunningham, Author of All This Was Mission

What can you tell us about your new release,  All This Was Mission?

All This was Mission is a story of self-reflection and self-forgiveness, and coming to terms with human existence.

It follows the journey of Madeline, who has made many mistakes—in her marriage and her life—and has paid dearly for them. She finds herself visiting a mysterious tropical resort called Ashrama with a group of strangers, all with their own problems.

Her trinity of hosts appears to have an ulterior motive for their guests’ visit, and Madeline must figure out what they intend for her. Ashrama holds many secrets, and in the end, as in the beginning, this place is not what it seems.

But neither is Madeline.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

I’ve always been an avid reader and I’ve always written, whether that was for personal satisfaction or as a part of my job. I have a degree in English Literature and creative writing, and I’ve been lucky to be able to pursue writing as a passion and to write as a part of my profession.

Writing All This Was Mission was a little bit different, in that it was very personal for me. As I hit middle age, I started to think back a lot about my life and things that maybe I could have done differently, and I realized that a lot of other people probably feel the same way.

At the same time, there is a danger in living in the past, just as there is a danger in looking for the next best thing in the future– because life is right here, in the present moment.

Writing All This Was Mission helped to remind me of the importance of living life right now in the present moment, and I hope that reading All This Was Mission will help my readers or audience to remember that, too.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

This is a tough one!

Literary Fiction: Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte—I love the dark moodiness and the poetic narrative.

Poetry/Philosophy: The Duino Elegies—Ranier Maria Rilke—Hands down the best work of literature that describes the human experience, in my opinion.

Romance: Coast Road by Barbara Delinsky—I still get chills when I read this book. It’s such a raw and honest look at failed marriage, family mistakes, regrets and hope.

Historical Fiction: The Secret Magdalene by Ki Longfellow—A controversial work that gives a feminist take on the Gospel. It offers a completely different perspective on a story that one typically accepts as Truth.

Young Adult: The Princess Bride by William Goldman—In addition to being a really great love story and action and adventure novel with amazing characterization and an extremely tight plot, I admire the use of the frame technique that Goldman uses. Masterful.

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask?

William Buter Yeats. I’m fascinated with his mysticism and interest in the occult. My question to him would be: How did your particular spiritual beliefs contribute to your writing and your creative process?

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

I consider myself an organized person. Generally, in my professional life, I am a planner, but when I write, no matter how adamant I am that I am going to stick to an outline, my characters seem to do things that surprise me. So I’ve stopped planning so much in my writing process. While that is sometimes hard for me, because I like control, I love the ways in which the characters take me by surprise. In those situations, it almost feels like the writing is coming through me rather than from me.

What is a typical day like for you?

I’ve been lucky in the past few months to have the opportunity to work for myself. I typically eat breakfast, then either write or work on a project for my Communications consulting business, Four Score Strategies. Around noon, I exercise for an hour, then run any errands or take care of administrative details. After dinner, I try to either write more or I read, but sometimes I binge watch The Office or something on Netflix.

What scene from All This Was Mission was your favorite to write?

Chapter 16, which is the final chapter (before the epilogue). It felt like a total release to write that part of the story, because it was the resolution to all that Madeline has gone through in her journey. She still has work to do, but her path has become clear to her. When I was writing that chapter, the words just seemed to flow from me.

Do you have a motto, quote, or philosophy you live by?

Yes, and the title of this novel comes from this passage by Ranier Maria Rilke in the Duino Elegies, the first Elegy.

Yes, the springtime needed you. Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing.

All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? Weren’t you always distracted by expectation, as if every event announced a beloved?

To me, this passage is about our ability to live in the present moment and be okay with life as it comes to you. As humans, we have a hard time doing that. We’re always looking for the next best thing, when just to be here, just to exist is a gift.

SJ Cunningham is the author of the new book All This Was Mission

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New Books to Read in Literary Fiction | February 23

Literary fiction readers are in for a treat. This week’s latest releases list is full of intriguing reads you won’t want to miss! The new releases list includes so many bestselling authors like S.J. Cunningham, Steve Physioc, Ruth Druart, and many more. Enjoy your new literary fiction books. Happy reading!



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The post New Books to Read in Literary Fiction | February 23 appeared first on NewInBooks.

New Books From Black Authors To Add To Your Reading List

In the spirit of celebrating Black History Month, the NewInBooks team has compiled a list of new releases by Black authors. From biographies to steamy romances, literary fiction to young adult, we’ve got something for every book worm. Please enjoy our selection and let us know if you have any recommendations!


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Interview with Max Milano, Author of Hollywood Expats

What can you tell us about your new release, Hollywood Expats?

I wanted to write a novel that read like a real-life travelogue written by American expats in Europe. A bit of an homage to “Tender is The Night” and “The Last Tycoon,” where I combined the Hollywood insider theme of “The Last Tycoon” with the Americans in Paris theme of “Tender is the Night.” It’s a tribute to F. Scott Fitzgerald and Hemingway but dragged kicking and screaming to the 21st century.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

My mom is a writer, and I started writing quite young. I wrote a novel in high school, but the manuscript is lost to history!

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

I’m a huge John le Carré fan, and my favorite book of his is “The Honorable Schoolboy.” I try to re-read it every couple of years. I’m also a huge Graham Greene fan, and I think his novel “The End Of The Affair” is a modern classic. “The Razor’s Edge” by W. Somerset Maugham has influenced my writing style the most (perhaps not for the best!) and made me a big fan of the unreliable narrator, or at least made me reject the idea of an omnipresent, all-knowing narrator.

Rounding up the list of my top 5 favorite books is 1984 by George Orwell (should be required reading at schools). For fifth place, it’s a toss-up between “Heart of Darkness” by Joseph Conrad (an unblinking view into the horrors of colonialism in the Belgian Congo, “Moby Dick” by Herman Melville, for his love of whales (one of my favorite animals), and “Lolita” by Vladimir Nabokov, for some of the best prose ever written in the English language and the most unreliable of unreliable narrators.

Interestingly, both Conrad and Nabokov weren’t native English speakers but ended up writing some of the most exquisite prose in the English Language. This is something that I take to heart as a non-native English writer who only writes in English (I’m from Venezuela originally).

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask?

Since my most favorite authors are all gone, I’d have to be someone like Bret Easton Ellis for his great prose (even if his themes seem vacuous at first glance). I’d ask him if he thinks that his books represent the progression (or really, regression) of the American WASP male as F. Scott Fitzgerald idealized it, through a downward spiral that begins with “Less Than Zero” and culminates with “American Psycho” and “Imperial Bedrooms” as a reflection of America’s decline by the corruption of its ruling class. Kind of like the fall of the Roman Empire due to the deterioration of its ruling class.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

Low budgets. If you want your character to drive a Ferrari and have a house on Mulholland drive, you can make it happen. And for free! Also, to preserve moments in time that can be read hundreds of years in the future and produce an emotional connection with a reader over the ages. That’s how I feel when I read Dickens or Conan Doyle. It’s an emotional connection across time, and there’s something magical about that.

What is a typical day like for you?

I haven’t really left the house since March 2020 due to Covid, so I’ve switched from dedicating time to my photography and filmmaking to focus more on writing and editing. I try to do some writing or editing every day when I’m working on a book.

I’ve also put a treadmill and a spin bike next to our balcony to workout with views of the Hollywood Hills as I watch a Netflix show in French or Italian to keep my mind busy learning something new every day.

What scene from Hollywood Expats was your favorite to write?

The scene where the French gangbangers show up was fun to write about because it was based on a real-life incident that wasn’t much fun to live through! Also, the Eurostar scene was the catalyst to begin writing the book due to another real-life incident on the Eurostar train between Paris and London (won’t give away any spoilers, you’ll have to read the book!)

Do you have a motto, quote, or philosophy you live by?

It has to be carpe diem if Covid has taught us anything. Fortunately, it was my motto before Covid as well.

Max Milano is the author of the new book Hollywood Expats.

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