Interview with Gabriel Farago, Author of The Lost Symphony

What can you tell us about your new release, The Lost Symphony?

A murdered tsarina. A lost musical masterpiece. A stolen Russian icon. Can Jack honor a promise made a long time ago, and solve an age-old mystery?

When acclaimed Australian journalist and author Jack Rogan inherits an old music box with a curious letter hidden inside, he decides to investigate. As he delves deeper into a murky past of secrets and violence, he soon discovers that he’s not the only one interested in solving the puzzle. Frieda Malenkova, a ruthless art dealer, and Victor Sokolov, a Russian billionaire with a dark past, will stop at nothing to achieve their deep desires and foil Jack’s valiant struggle to uncover the truth. Joining forces with Mademoiselle Darrieux, a flamboyant Paris socialite, and Claude Dupree, a retired French police officer, Jack enters a dangerous world of unbridled ambition, murder and greed that threatens to destroy him. On a perilous journey that takes him deep into Russia, Jack follows a tortuous path of discovery, disappointment and betrayal that brings him face to face with his destiny. Will Jack unravel the hidden clues left behind by a desperate empress? Can he save the precious legacy of a genius before it’s too late, and return a holy icon revered by generations to where it belongs?

The Lost Symphony – book 6 in the Jack Rogan Mysteries – was an ambitious project, and I look forward with great anticipation to the feedback from my readers.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

I love language and literature. Expressing yourself through writing is a wonderful, intellectual adventure. I was introduced to reading, especially the classics, at a young age by my grandfather, and I was hooked. Tolstoy’s War and Peace was one of my favorites, and I thought, perhaps one day … I can write something like that! Well, I’m still trying, but we must never stop dreaming!

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

Tolstoy’s War and Peace; Duma’s The Three Musketeers; Michener’s Tales of the South Pacific; Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express; Hemingway’s For Whom the Bell Tolls; Stieg Larsson’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask?

If I could have a ‘literary seance’ I would ask Alexandre Dumas and Agatha Christie to join the show. I would ask them about the best way to portray characters. To me, characters are the lifeblood of a good book, in my case a nail-biting thriller. Characters bring the storyline to life and are the most important tool an author can use to make a book a page-turner. If my seance should turn out to be a little ambitious, I would ask a fellow author, James Patterson, to the show, and ask him the same questions.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

The intellectual challenge, and the adventure of it all. I always strive for elusive perfection in my writing, but alas, I suspect it will forever remain just that; elusive!

What is a typical day like for you?

Once I start writing a book, I have a relentless routine. I write every day, usually late at night – always while listening to music – and review what I’ve written the day before in the morning. I exercise a lot during the day. This involves long walks in the rainforest below our house in the Blue Mountains just outside Sydney. I live on the edge of a World Heritage National Park, which helps. I am a keen gardener, and work in our large garden during the day, thinking about my characters and the storyline. Once I return to my attic, I write all this down, and after dinner, the actual writing begins. There’s little time for sleep. But sleep is such a waste of time, isn’t it?

What scene from The Lost Symphony was your favorite to write?

This is a hard one, because the book is complex, and a big read of more than 500 pages. That said, on reflection, perhaps chapter 5 – The Seance St Petersburg: December 1894 -would be a good choice.

Do you have a motto, quote, or philosophy you live by?

Yes. The best is yet to come!

Gabriel Farago is the author of the new book The Lost Symphony.

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New Mystery and Thriller Books to Read | December 1

Hold on to the edge of your seat as we hunt for clues and solve the case with these exciting new mystery and thriller books for the week! There are so many bestselling authors with new novels for you to dive into this week including Gabriel Farago, Caz Frear, Katie Sise, Harriet Tyce, and many more. Enjoy your new mystery, thriller, and suspense novels. Happy reading!



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The Buzziest Books of November | 2020

The Buzziest Books of November | 2020

The month of November was a great time for readers with a host of exciting releases from bestselling authors. There were so many page-turning novels that captivated us from cover to cover this month. If you want to catch up on the books everyone was talking about, here are our choices for the buzziest books of November. Happy reading!


Daylight

by David Baldacci

Release Date: November 17, 2020

For many long years, Atlee Pine was tormented by uncertainty after her twin sister, Mercy, was abducted at the age of six and never seen again. Now, just as Atlee is pressured to end her investigation into Mercy’s disappearance, she finally gets her most promising breakthrough yet: the identity of her sister’s kidnapper, Ito Vincenzo. With time running out, Atlee and her assistant Carol Blum race to Vincenzo’s last known location in Trenton, New Jersey.

Buy on Amazon

A Promised Land

by Barack Obama

Release Date: November 17, 2020

In the stirring, highly anticipated first volume of his presidential memoirs, Barack Obama tells the story of his improbable odyssey from young man searching for his identity to leader of the free world, describing in strikingly personal detail both his political education and the landmark moments of the first term of his historic presidency—a time of dramatic transformation and turmoil.

Buy on Amazon

Ready Player Two

by Ernest Cline

Release Date: November 24, 2020

Days after winning OASIS founder James Halliday’s contest, Wade Watts makes a discovery that changes everything. Hidden within Halliday’s vaults, waiting for his heir to find, lies a technological advancement that will once again change the world and make the OASIS a thousand times more wondrous—and addictive—than even Wade dreamed possible. With it comes a new riddle, and a new quest—a last Easter egg from Halliday, hinting at a mysterious prize.

Buy on Amazon

The Law of Innocence

by Michael Connelly

Release Date: November 10, 2020

On the night he celebrates a big win, defense attorney Mickey Haller is pulled over by police, who find the body of a former client in the trunk of his Lincoln. Haller is immediately charged with murder but can’t post the exorbitant $5 million bail slapped on him by a vindictive judge. Mickey elects to represent himself and is forced to mount his defense from his jail cell in the Twin Towers Correctional Center in downtown Los Angeles.

Buy on Amazon

The Ickabog

by J K Rowling

Release Date: November 10, 2020

Once upon a time there was a tiny kingdom called Cornucopia, as rich in happiness as it was in gold, and famous for its food. From the delicate cream cheeses of Kurdsburg to the Hopes-of-Heaven pastries of Chouxville, each was so delicious that people wept with joy as they ate them.

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Fortune and Glory

by Janet Evanovich

Release Date: November 3, 2020

When Stephanie’s beloved Grandma Mazur’s new husband died on their wedding night, the only thing he left her was a beat-up old easy chair…and the keys to a life-changing fortune. But as Stephanie and Grandma Mazur search for Jimmy Rosolli’s treasure, they discover that they’re not the only ones on the hunt. Two dangerous enemies from the past stand in their way—along with a new adversary who’s even more formidable.

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White Ivy

by Susie Yang

Release Date: November 3, 2020

Ivy Lin is a thief and a liar—but you’d never know it by looking at her. Raised outside of Boston, Ivy’s immigrant grandmother relies on Ivy’s mild appearance for cover as she teaches her granddaughter how to pilfer items from yard sales and second-hand shops. Thieving allows Ivy to accumulate the trappings of a suburban teen—and, most importantly, to attract the attention of Gideon Speyer, the golden boy of a wealthy political family.

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The Awakening

by Nora Roberts

Release Date: November 24, 2020

When Breen Kelly was a girl, her father would tell her stories of magical places. Now she’s an anxious twentysomething mired in student debt and working a job she hates. But one day she stumbles upon a shocking discovery: her mother has been hiding an investment account in her name. It has been funded by her long-lost father—and it’s worth nearly four million dollars.

Buy on Amazon

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Our Audiobook Playlist For November | 2020

Our Audiobook Playlist For November | 2020

We wanted to share with you some of our favorite audiobooks we’ve been listening to in November. Our playlist includes a little something for everyone from mystery, romance, literary fiction, fantasy, and memoir. Grab your headphones and happy listening!


Piece of My Heart

by Mary Higgins Clark

Television producer Laurie Moran and her fiancée, Alex Buckley, the former host of her investigative television show, are just days away from their mid-summer wedding, when things take a dark turn. Alex’s seven-year-old nephew, Johnny, vanishes from the beach. A search party begins, and witnesses recall Johnny playing in the water and collecting shells behind the beach shack, but no one remembers seeing him after the morning.

Buy on Amazon

All That Glitters

by Danielle Steel

Nicole “Coco” Martin is destined to have it all. As the only child of doting and successful parents, she has been given every opportunity in life. Having inherited her mother’s stunning beauty and creativity, along with her father’s work ethic and diligence, she has the world at her feet. Her graduation from Columbia is fast approaching, and with it the summer job of her dreams working at a magazine.

Buy on Amazon

No Time Like the Future

by Michael J. Fox

In No Time Like the Future: An Optimist Considers Mortality, Michael J. Fox shares personal stories and observations about illness and health, aging, the strength of family and friends, and how our perceptions about time affect the way we approach mortality. Thoughtful and moving, but with Fox’s trademark sense of humor, his audiobook provides a vehicle for reflection about our lives, our loves, and our losses.

Buy on Amazon

One Time Only

by Lauren Blakely

Ever hear the story about the bodyguard who falls for the rock star? Yeah, it never ends well. Each day I remind myself that it’s my job to protect Stone. And nowhere in the job description does it say I should lust after the charismatic, charming man. Especially since we’re opposites. But every night I spend with him the dangerous, off-limits attraction grows more intense.

Until one night in a limo when we combust.

Buy on Amazon

The Kingdom

by Jo Nesbo

Roy has never left the quiet mountain town he grew up in, unlike his little brother Carl who couldn’t wait to get out and escape his troubled past. Just like everyone else in town, Roy believed Carl was gone for good. But Carl has big plans for his hometown. And when he returns with a mysterious new wife and a business opportunity that seems too good to be true, simmering tensions begin to surface and unexplained deaths in the town’s past come under new scrutiny.

Buy on Amazon

Spellbreaker

by Charlie N. Holmberg

The orphaned Elsie Camden learned as a girl that there were two kinds of wizards in the world: those who pay for the power to cast spells and those, like her, born with the ability to break them. But as an unlicensed magic user, her gift is a crime. Commissioned by an underground group known as the Cowls, Elsie uses her spellbreaking to push back against the aristocrats and help the common man. She always did love the tale of Robin Hood.

Buy on Amazon

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Bestsellers Now in Paperback | November 2020

Take a look at this month’s selection of bestsellers now in paperback! November had a great selection of bestselling books to check out from thrilling mysteries to enthralling literary reads, and insightful biographies. Pick up these latest paperback books by bestselling authors Clive Cussler, Jayne Ann Krentz, James Patterson, Elizabeth Strout, Bernard Cornwell, Pam Jenoff, Nora Roberts, and many more!


Mystery, Thriller & Suspense


Literary Fiction


Fantasy & Science Fiction

Young Adult


Biography & Memoir

The post Bestsellers Now in Paperback | November 2020 appeared first on NewInBooks.

Bestsellers Now in Paperback | November 2020

Take a look at this month’s selection of bestsellers now in paperback! November had a great selection of bestselling books to check out from thrilling mysteries to enthralling literary reads, and insightful biographies. Pick up these latest paperback books by bestselling authors Clive Cussler, Jayne Ann Krentz, James Patterson, Elizabeth Strout, Bernard Cornwell, Pam Jenoff, Nora Roberts, and many more!


Mystery, Thriller & Suspense


Literary Fiction


Fantasy & Science Fiction

Young Adult


Biography & Memoir

The post Bestsellers Now in Paperback | November 2020 appeared first on NewInBooks.

Must-Read Mystery Novels | November 2020

Must-Read Mystery Novels | November 2020

Searching for some new mystery books to add to your reading list? You’re in luck because we’ve made a new list of some of our must-read mystery book recommendations. Check out the latest releases from bestselling authors Baer Charlton, Gabriel Farago, Eric Weule, Kirsten Fullmer, David Baldacci, and Janet Evanovich. Enjoy your new books!


Flat Surf

by Baer Charlton

Release Date: November 1, 2020

The new Frank Pounds novel by Baer Charlton… California’s Orange County is famous for television shows of the rich and famous, the rich and disturbed, and neither. Big surf to flat surf, Orange County isn’t what you see on TV. A headless body turns up on a beach. Former sheriff’s detective Frank Pounds is dragged from medical retirement because he may know the identity of the body.

Buy on Amazon

The Lost Symphony

by Gabriel Farago

Release Date: November 30, 2020

The sixth book in the Jack Rogan Mysteries Series by award-winning and bestselling author Gabriel Farago… When acclaimed Australian journalist and author Jack Rogan inherits an old music box with a curious letter hidden inside, he decides to investigate. As he delves deeper into a murky past of secrets and violence, he soon discovers that he’s not the only one interested in solving the puzzle.

Buy on Amazon

Caffeine & Nicotine

by Eric Weule

Release Date: November 10, 2020

Kelly Jenks knows the dead boy is going to show him something awful. Jonathan is seven. He never wears shoes, and his feet are always clean. He cruises between this world and the next in a 1967 Cougar XR7. Jonathan has a message for Kelly: There is a faceless man preying on the city’s homeless. Jackie Carmichael hires Kelly to find an employee who has vanished. The case appears simple at first, but Kelly soon discovers that the missing girl is not who she seems.

Buy on Amazon

Problems at the Pub

by Kirsten Fullmer

Release Date: November 14, 2020

The fourth book in the Sugar Mountain Series by Kirsten Fullmer… The enchanting tourist town of Sugar Mountain, NC is rewriting its tax codes, and no one knows why. Mayor Winslow is up to no good, and he doesn’t seem to care what happens to the local business owners; at least that’s how it feels to Monique Brewer, the local tavern owner. She’s proud of making her own way in the world, and messing with her business is a sure way to get her riled. Sounds like another job for The Sugar Mountain Ladies Historical Society!

Buy on Amazon

Fortune and Glory

by Janet Evanovich

Release Date: November 3, 2020

The third book in the Atlee Pine Series by New York Times Bestselling Author David Baldacci… For many long years, Atlee Pine was tormented by uncertainty after her twin sister, Mercy, was abducted at the age of six and never seen again. Now, just as Atlee is pressured to end her investigation into Mercy’s disappearance, she finally gets her most promising breakthrough yet: the identity of her sister’s kidnapper, Ito Vincenzo.

Buy on Amazon

Daylight

by David Baldacci

Release Date: November 17, 2020

The 27th book in the Stephanie Plum Series by New York Times Bestselling Author David Baldacci… When Stephanie’s beloved Grandma Mazur’s new husband died on their wedding night, the only thing he left her was a beat-up old easy chair…and the keys to a life-changing fortune. But as Stephanie and Grandma Mazur search for Jimmy Rosolli’s treasure, they discover that they’re not the only ones on the hunt. Two dangerous enemies from the past stand in their way—along with a new adversary who’s even more formidable.

Buy on Amazon

The post Must-Read Mystery Novels | November 2020 appeared first on NewInBooks.

Interview with Baer Charlton, Author of Flat Surf

What can you tell us about your new release, Flat Surf?

Flat Surf kicks off a new location and character. The term “flat surf” or a surfer’s comment that the “surf is dead flat” can also be a commentary on the moment or situation.

Orange County is known for the glitz and glamour of the rich and famous. For surfers, it’s more of “where the money meets the sea.” As a setting, the old rule of thumb applies: The greater the concentration of wealth, the higher the statistical occurrence of nefarious activity. To paraphrase one who would know: “For every handful of millionaires, there is a thumb who didn’t get there legally.”

Frank Pounds was an Orange County Sheriff’s detective. An attempt on his life and killing his partner haunts his life mentally and physically. Medically retired, he is a recluse into his inherited trust and surfing. He wears his “I don’t give a fuck” attitude on his sleeve.

A body (without a head) is found on one of the more affluent beaches. Pounds is coaxed from retirement to consult because he might know the body and his intimate knowledge of the surfing world and his undisputed standing of excellence—albeit unorthodox and irreverent—at solving complex crimes.

My love for the quirkiness of Carl Hiaasen, twisted trails of Rodrick Thorpe, and the loose family building of T. Jefferson Parker gave me the rootstock to build an irreverent story about the other side of OC.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

Many greats cut their scars on my soul from an early age: Robert Louis Stevenson gave me the complex inner war with his Jekyll and Hyde; Hugo instructed me on the multifaceted face of unrequited lust with Quasimodo; Wells took me to the bottom of the ocean. And a young woman told me a strange tale of man’s obsession with creating and the monster who has his revenge on his creator. And then, I entered the fifth grade and met Hemingway.

But as for becoming a writer? It was closer to home. I learned to read by setting type for my mother. Instead of “See Dick run,” I learned Steven Armond Osofsky, Orthopedic Surgeon. As the years of evenings went by, with the mind-numbing labor of printing a single card one thousand times, Mom and I entertained ourselves by making up stories in our heads. The salient notes were cribbed on yellow five-by-seven print cards. The small stack was held together by a single red and a blue printer’s rubber bands. The stack was split in half and then faced to keep all the writing safe.

After my mother passed, my father handed me the stack saying, “I think your mother wanted you to have this.” I tossed it into the back of my desk drawer until I got a new computer. Weeding out the garbage, I found the packet. My mother typed 120wpm, was a perfect speller and grammarian, and a medical transcriber. She would type a couple of three- or four-page chatty letters on her fifteen-minute breaks. But she couldn’t bring herself to write up and submit our stories. In that, her self-doubt trumped my shyness.

As I sat in my small, rented room, I removed the rubber bands. I could smell my mother, the ink, the press oil, and the weight of our years of collaboration. My mother’s presence was powerful and inescapable. I inserted my two thumbnails and separated the stack, and a small scrap of yellow paper fluttered to the floor. I leaned over and stared at the single word written on the fool scrap. The magnitude overwhelmed me. This was the sum of my true inheritance from my mother, best friend, confidant, and mentor.

The blue ink on the yellow paper read: Publish.

With much complaining and childish whining, I submitted my first article of a sideline career as a photojournalist, stretching for decades. I sold the article a week later.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

Victor Hugo’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame is the greatest love and lust story to this day. From the priest’s forbidden lust for Quasimodo to Quasimodo’s pure love for Esmeralda to her lust for the captain of the guard, Hugo wove a web that no spider could build.

Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein built the complexity of human nature. The monster’s story is the teen’s lament about why they were ever born and “hating” their parents. If the youth of today were to read the original, I believe it would still resonate.

Hemingway and his The Old Man and the Sea sounds like a trope or cliché, but for me, it was a deep study of what drives people. It explained Moby Dick, The Count of Monte Cristo, and Silence of the Lambs.

More contemporary is Rodrick Thorpe’s Rainbow Drive. (Most would know his Christmas Carol and Bruce Willis throwing Hans Gruber off the tower…) What starts as a simple crime story soon becomes more of a spider’s web than China Town. About the time you think the story is wrapping up and explained, there is an auto accident, and you realize you’re not even halfway through. It was a piece d’ resistance, and he could have, or should have, stopped there.

Ken Follet grabbed me early with his Eye of the Needle, and The Eagle Has Landed. Then there were years of silence. I read a short article about him meeting a then-dying Louie L’Amour and how they roamed around Europe’s ancient sites together. It inspired him to write long-style and with a complex storyline. His tour de force encompassed power, love, lust, sin, and religion. Pillars of the Earth is, far and away, his greatest story.

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask?

I would have to step out of the usual bookshelf and go with a great storyteller, Dolly Parton. She’s known for many things, but most see her work only as music. I want to get her take on how she transitions from emotion to story to music.

But if I could have any writer, even if dead, it would be Ernest Hemingway. No question. I would just set down the bottle and humidor on the poop deck of a sailboat and just let him open up. About the third or fifth shot, I’d start recording.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

Killing people.

Wait. Sorry. That was one of my new characters trying to get out. If anyone was offended, I’m not responsible.

Some would call it being God, but the truth is, I only get to set things up. Once the characters are mature enough and ready to go, I get them in a room and layout the book. And then, after they have tied me to a chair and duct-taped my mouth, they tell me how I’m going to tell their story.

Sometimes having them sit on my bed in the middle of the night, stab me in the ribs with a sword or handgun, and tell me to get up and write—can be a pain. But having the characters reveal their stories, knowing they are coming from somewhere within me, is the juice. Sharing those stories with fans—that’s just icing on the cake.

What is a typical day like for you?

Boring. Cast-iron mind-numbingly routine. Up, pack my wife’s lunch, make mine, load her lunch and briefcase in her car, make breakfast… Are you sure you want to hear this?

Typically, I sneak an hour of writing in before I clean up and go to work. At work, I do the mindless stuff like edit, rewrite, throw away any bad runs up dark alleys, and listen to the characters talk about their days. And then, after the day has boiled to dried poop, and I’m about to get up from the computer and sleep—the cold muzzle of a large caliber handgun leans into the nape of my neck. There is no dialog. Everything floods in, and the fingers work their crippled dance of whatever needs to be relayed, key by key, click by click, and my eyes follow on the screen

I did not inherit the writing and typing gene from my mother. Cleaning up the raw is the long and boring job, and then my long-suffering and muchly talented editor, Rogena Mitchell-Jones, takes over with her bloody red pen. (She wanted to remove “muchly,” but I left it in because I can.)

What scene from Flat Surf was your favorite to write?

My favorite would have to be the opening scene with the coyote, which is properly pronounced coy-o-te. Every one of my books, except What About Marsha?—cowritten with Shye Ryder, has a pivotal animal. In this book, Frank Pounds has a relationship with a wild coyote. The door is open, and the bed is fair game. There is a caring humanity about coyotes, and this one was there. The suffering (or not suffering) of a battered body becoming upright and moving can only be written from experience. Getting it out of my gut was therapeutic. There is a lot of therapy in this book.

Opening a book in a nightmare and the character waking up is a badly abused trope. Turning the trope into an examination of backstory, introducing an acquired quirk, and introducing potential threat-turned-comrade, turns the trope inside out and works—unless the critics hate it.

Do you have a motto, quote, or philosophy you live by?

In 1987, the year before I was run over by a truck and lost decades of memory, I stopped at a diner in the backwoods of Oregon. I think the sign read Mom and Dad’s EAT. Their twenty-six-year-old daughter, a high functioning Down’s Syndrome, was the only waitress. She sold me on the “best coffee in town” and the best biscuits I had ever had. And then I ordered breakfast.

Somewhere while hearing their story from her mother, having way too many homemade biscuits with homemade strawberry freezer jam and bottomless coffee refills, the daughter asked me a question.

When much was lost in the fog of memory loss, the question and the sense of the log cabin diner hung in my being. It took me years to get it back to where it all belonged. It was powerful enough for me to build my tour de force book Stoneheart around.

“Are you someone I need to know or are you just passing through?”

Baer Charlton is the author of the new book Flat Surf.

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Interview with Eric Weule, Author of Caffeine & Nicotine

What can you tell us about your new release, Caffeine & Nicotine?

Caffeine & Nicotine is a surf noir mystery with a touch of the supernatural. It is the second book featuring Kelly Jenks.
The novel focuses on a series of murders and a missing young woman. There’s plenty of coffee, cigarettes, mystery, and music. And, maybe a couple of ghosts.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

My family read The Stand out loud every night during the summer of 1982. It took the whole summer, but it was the defining moment in my life as far as wanting to be an author. I started writing the day after we finished and I haven’t stopped since. I took a couple extended breaks, but stories are always running through my head. Once a writer, always a writer.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

This isn’t even a fair question, there are so many books that I love. Hundreds of them. So, I will narrow it down to the five most influential books I’ve read.
1) The Stand by Stephen King. The book that started it all for me. He’s written a number of better books, but it is definitely the most influential.
2) Gone South by Robert McCammon. Boy’s Life is up there, too. Gone South was the first book I read that blended horror with mystery and I loved it.
3) The Tomb by F. Paul Wilson. Repairman Jack is one of my favorite characters in fiction. I am, and always will be, in awe of Wilson as a writer.
4) A is for Alibi by Sue Grafton. Kinsey Millhone is up there on my list of favorite characters. She was also my first fictional crush. Grafton was one of the best.
5) Every Dead Thing by John Connolly. Charlie Parker is my number one. Connolly is my favorite writer and he is a constant influence on my work.

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask?

Robert McCammon would be my first guest. I would ask him if he regretted taking a decade off from writing. The struggles he went through to get Speaks the Nightbird published just blew my mind.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

I love watching the characters evolve as I write. They’re just ideas in my head, and then they become their own independent beings. It’s like raising kids, only much faster and no diapers or college tuition.

What is a typical day like for you?

I work full-time at my day job. I write an hour or two every night when I’m actively writing a novel. Other than that, just normal life shizz. Feed the dogs, hang out with my partner, Stephanie, and enjoy what life has to give me.

What scene from Caffeine & Nicotine was your favorite to write?

There’s a very cool scene near the end of the book where Ryan and Jackie go surfing. I loved writing it, but it was stressful because I had to nail the feel and emotion of what they were sharing while riding waves. The hardcore surfers who have read it gave me props for that scene, so I’m happy.

Do you have a motto, quote, or philosophy you live by?

My philosophy is to work hard and take care of the people I love. I can’t control the world, I can only make sure I’m doing right by my family. That’s all that matters.

Do you have any reviews of the book you’d like to share?

“Mystery, crime, and the supernatural are all mixed in Caffeine & Nicotine by Eric Weule, an engaging story with a lot of fun characters and a gripping plot. If you enjoy atmospheric writing, terrific descriptions, and humorous narrative, then this is a great treat for you.” – Romuald Dzemo for Readers’ Favorite

“A solid and absorbing piece of work” – Debra Doyle, co-author of the Mageworlds series

“The dark and intriguing backdrop of Caffeine & Nicotine by Eric Weule captivated my interest immediately. This is a brilliant tale of suspense, human relationships, and the mysteries of the afterlife.” – Lesley Jones for Readers’ Favorite

“It is as if Mr. Weule has taken the best elements of the genre and modernized them, but done so immersed in finely tuned relationship studies.” – Austrian Spencer, author of The Sadeiest

“It is dark and gritty, a mixture of crime and the supernatural, with several subplots weaving through the main story, all tying in nicely. The author has a way of writing that draws you in and makes you feel as though you are there in the story and offers plenty of action to keep you interested.” – Anne-Marie Reynolds for Readers’ Favorite

Eric Weule is the author of the new book Caffeine & Nicotine.

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Interview with Kirsten Fullmer, Author of Problems at the Pub

What can you tell us about your new release, Problems at the Pub?

Problems at the Pub is book four of the Sugar Mountain Series, which feature the fearless women of the Sugar Mountain Ladies Historical Society. This book is set in the town pub, owned by the lovely but notoriously snarky, Monique Brewer. In the other three books we aren’t sure why Monique is so standoffish, but in book four we get a glimpse into her home, her work, and her motivations, as well as her heart. We also find Mayor Winslow up to his old tricks, raising taxes on local businesses, which Monique cannot afford. Adding to Monique’s problems, her cougar of a mother drops in for an extended visit. Her life may be tipped upside down, but Monique is not about to let the mayor, or anyone else, ruin her dreams of buying a house. Enter the mayor’s new assistant, Anthony Tidwell, who appears to be assisting Mayor Winslow’s dastardly deeds. Of course, Monique and the ladies immediately dive in to investigate, leading missions into the court house and stealthily shadowing Mr. Tidwell’s activities. Monique even lets him move in over the pub in order to watch him more closely. But letting a handsome and charming man like Tony get too close is something she may regret…

If Problems at the Pub is turned into a movie, who would you pick to play the main characters?

Since Monique is part Asian, I’d choose Maggie Q, and for Tony, who resembles a young Sam Elliot, I’d chose Paul Rudd with a handlebar mustache.

What’s the last book you read?

Throughout the whole Covid thing, I’ve sought comfort in old favorites and reread several Linda Lael Miller books from my library.

What’s on your writing desk?

If you’re referring to what is physically on my desk, it’s far too much clutter. It has become a dumping ground for things I don’t want to lose. Keeping my desktop clean and clear is an ongoing struggle. If you mean what am I working on now, I am currently writing book two of Love on the Line, featuring Grandpa Buck, along with Andy and Rooster who continue their ill-fated romance while building a pipeline through rugged and difficult terrain. Book two also offers Nick a bit of romance with a new girl on the coating crew!

What’s in your Netflix queue?

I’m a documentary junkie, currently interested in shows about new technology and archeology.

What scene in Problems at the Pub was your favorite to write?

My favorite scene in this book is the one where Monique finally breaks down and opens up. Oftentimes we don’t know what people have been through and why they cope the way they do. This scene is not only hilarious, it depicts why so many of us ladies feel like we can’t depend on others. As an author, I really love that pivotal scene where everything goes pear shaped for my leading lady.

Kirsten Fullmer is the author of the new book Problems at the Pub.

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