Interview with the Authors of Leave Me Breathless: The Ivy Collection

What can you tell us about your new release, Leave Me Breathless: The Ivy Collection?

Response from author KL Donn: My title, Command, is one of the books in the Leave Me Breathless Ivy Collection. It was originally titled Bought Bride and supposed to be released in Fiona Davenport’s PVB Kindle world before the program closed in 2018. It’s a spin-off of my dark romance series: The Adair Empire. While it has some scenes that could have gone to the dark side (Channeling my inner Star Wars here LOL) I kept it lighter, more contemporary. Viktor is an intense man who deserved the light Emmy brought to his life after he did some not so savory things in his younger days.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

Response from CM Lally: I’ve been influenced by a who and a what. First who: other Indie authors inspired me to be an author. Just seeing their reactions to my reviews and watching them post on Facebook about building the story up from overheard conversations to finding the perfect muse, it made me want a piece of that. It is an unbridled joy when a great review validates your time and efforts. For the what of inspiring me, it was the feeling of not being satisfied with some aspect of a story I was reading. My brain wanted it to go another way. Not to say my way would have been better, just what I expected with my experiences for their HEA or whatever was going on. I would become so invested in their story, I wanted control over it’s middle or ending or whatever part I didn’t like. So I decided to write my own.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

Response from K.L. Humphreys:

When It Rains by Lisa De Jong

Lady Luck By Kristen Ashley

Scream for Me By Karen Rose

Yes to Everything By Shayne McClendon

Game of The Heart by Kristen Ashley

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask?

Response from author Sophia Henry: I would have Stephen King as my first guest. (I like to aim high.) I’d ask him how he comes up with his ideas. I truly believe he is an unmatched genius in the modern literary world. It’s absolutely amazing to me that he has consistently come up with so many high-concept ideas over multiple genres. He appeals not just to horror fans but also to the masses, evoking extreme emotion with stories such as Stand By Me, The Green Mile, and Shawshank Redemption.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

Response from author Sophia Henry: Being able to use my platform to connect with readers on a personal level. Sometimes I call my books “social commentary wrapped up in a happily ever after.” It’s important for me to use real issues we face every day in my stories. I love when readers tell me they empathize with characters, see themselves in a character, or want to be friends with my characters! I love when readers tell me my books helped them through a tough time in their life. I love when readers tell me my books helped them see a different perspective.

What is a typical day like for you?

Response from author Evan Grace: I get up at 6 every morning to get everyone up and ready for school and work. We’re a one car family so after I drop everyone off I go lift weights for about an hour. Once I get home I get cleaned up and then sit down to write for a few hours until it’s time to pick everyone up. After dinner I do some admin stuff then I write until about 9 or 10pm and then lay in bed, reading until I finally go to sleep.

What scene in Leave Me Breathless: The Ivy Collection was your favorite to write?

Response from Michelle Windsor: My absolute favorite scene to write in Catching Chase was when Jasper Chase finds out he has a three year old child from a woman he fell for four years earlier. There are so many emotions that I had to write; confusion, shock, anger, betrayal, in such quick succession. It wasn’t anything I had written before, so it was a great new challenge, and I think it came out beautifully! Can’t wait for everyone to read it!

Do you have a motto, quote or philosophy you live by?

Response from CM Lally: My motto for writing is “to do the story and characters justice”. By this I mean…do the research needed, take time to find the perfect words by understanding where you want their story to go. It may be fiction but it’s an escape and the feelings still need to be real.

Leave Me Breathless: The Ivy Collection

 

Leave Me Breathless: The Ivy Collection is the new romance collection from KL Donn, Ashley Lane, Evan Grace, K.L. Humphreys, C.M. Lally, Natalie Hill, Michelle Windsor, and Sophia Henry.

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The Story Behind Ruthless Love by Penelope Bloom

By Penelope Bloom

My newest book, Ruthless Love, is what’s called a “bully romance”. Even if you’ve never heard of a bully romance, it probably seems like a pretty wild jump to go from romantic comedies about bananas and cherry pies to writing about bullies falling for the girls they pick on. But hear me out!

As much as I love writing goofy, wild books that are designed to make you laugh while you fall for the characters, there’s a catch to rom com: the humor comes with a cost.

I always think of it in terms of old sitcoms. It was really common for shows in the 90s and 80s to be filled with laugh track moments, but they would always try to get serious near the end and teach a lesson. Or there would even be “special” episodes that tackled a serious problem like a character’s alcoholism or abuse. To me, it always felt jarring. I didn’t usually turn on The Fresh Prince for an emotional rollercoaster like the episode where someone gets shot.

Those memories have stuck with me, and I always keep it in the back of my head when I’m writing. With my rom coms, I know why readers are in my book. They’re looking for light-hearted fun and laughs. That means every time I get tempted to turn a plot arc more serious or darker, I have to ask myself if I’m wanting to do that selfishly or if it serves the purpose of the book. Almost always, it’s just selfishness. It would be satisfying for me as a writer to explore something more deeply, but I have to admit it’s not best for the book and let the opportunity slip away.

That brings me to this book. After over a year of exclusively writing romantic comedies, I’ve had a lot of built up desire to write something more serious and with a little more edge. Ruthless Love is the start of that series of books. As I hoped, it felt so therapeutic to write this, and it was one of the fastest books I’ve written in a long time for that reason. Back when I first switched from standard contemporary romance to romantic comedy, the same thing happened. I had this burst of excited energy when I jumped into the Objects of Attraction series that made the first three or four books fly by.

Back then, I had convinced myself that I needed to get over it. The Objects series did so well that I felt obligated to stay in the romantic comedy arena. I knew a bunch of new readers had discovered me because of those books, and it felt like I’d be confusing them and irritating them by writing something with a different tone.

Over time, I realized it was worse to keep forcing myself to chug away aht something that didn’t feel natural. The books wouldn’t be as good, because I didn’t have that excited energy.

So that brings me here. Maybe it’s not the wisest business decision from a “branding” perspective, but I’m going to keep chasing what makes me energized as an author. I’ve always had one belief as an author that I try to hold above anything else: Write the best books I can, improve and learn from my mistakes, and the rest will follow.

In that spirit, I’m so excited to bring my newest release to you all: Ruthless Love. If you’ve never read a bully romance or heard of it, the trope is pretty interesting. There’s a pretty wide spectrum as far as how dark the books trend. Mine is definitely on the lighter side, but the main characteristic of these books is the characters tend to be younger, like in high school or college. Beyond that, the hero in the book is more of an anti-hero, and he bullies or enables bullying of the heroine to start the book. As in all romances, he ends up changing his ways and falling for her, but (to me) the thing that makes this trope so fun is how impossible it can seem to imagine the characters getting together at first. So it’s all about creating that insanely thick wall between them and then watching them find ways to overcome it for the rest of the book.

I’m super thrilled with how this book turned out, and I hope you’ll check it out. Thanks so much!

Penelope Bloom is the author of the new book Ruthless Love.

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Interview with Jeffrey Freedman, Author of The Spark Anomaly

What can you tell us about your new release, The Spark Anomaly?

The Spark Anomaly transports you to a world that is not so very different from our own. However, certain subtle differences have a huge impact on the characters, their situations, the environment, and the interactions between them. The characters are thrown into an action/adventure global mystery that they need to solve to save the world. The principal characters are:

  • Arnold Spark, an engineering adventurer who searches the globe for the apocalyptic truth behind recent cataclysmic events;
  • Soona, a lonely lunar robot with a mysterious backstory who must escape her cruel human captors to search for answers on the comet Charybdis;
  • Helen, a bereaved widow who blames Spark for her husband’s death;
  • And Cathy, a shy college student who is oblivious to Spark’s quest but dutifully solves his disguised homework problems.

I relate most to Cathy, because she reminds me of myself when I was in college, and I admire Soona the most for her grit and heart.

As an engineer, I had a lot of fun designing yet-to-be-discovered scientific laws and new technologies to permeate their world, but I tried my best to keep them in the background so as not to slow the story’s pacing.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

I first started writing as a substitute for fulfilling my lifelong quest to create sentient life. Years ago, I designed software that simulated the evolution of an alien world. Through strict survival-of-the-fittest principles, life forms evolved that exhibited complex behaviors, including species that learned to ambush prey and hunt their parents. After watching these newly evolved creatures chase each other around my graphics screen, I knew that this approach was the best approach to one day create sentient life. I imagined spending the rest of my days designing ever more complex life forms.

However, after realizing that the effort to create sentient life would be massive, I decided instead to write my first novel, Prena’s Eye, about a simulated world and my imagined success in creating intelligent life. Then once I had started writing, I fell in love with the process. Now I’m hooked.

What is your favorite novel?

My favorite novel is Ken Follett’s Pillars of the Earth. I love how Follett relentlessly drives the plot with lots of action, plot twists, and compelling three-dimensional characters while seamlessly weaving in historical facts and explanations of the technical challenges of cathedral building—without ever boring the reader.

I attempted to strike a similar balance in The Spark Anomaly by integrating a fully realized world set in 2067 with a fast-paced story, plot twists, and exciting characters.

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask?

The last thing I would ever want to do is host a literary talk show. But if I had to choose a guest, I might pick Douglas Adams. I would ask him about the meaning of life, the universe, and everything. He should have better insight into those matters now that he’s dead.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

The high I get from writing a novel is like the high I get from reading a novel, but with ten times the intensity. I delight in watching a new universe come to life. I fall in love with my characters. And even though I’m the cause of their misery, I sympathize with their situation.

What is a typical day like for you?

I try to write for at least an hour every day, first thing in the morning. Then I compete in an ongoing Internet-based stationary bike competition.

During my commute into the office, I daydream about plot lines and characters.

I spend the rest of the workday as the CEO and CTO of a pair of high-tech engineering companies I co-founded. I have over fifty engineers and programmers working for me.

In the evening, I go home to my wife and three children, where I typically referee my children’s ongoing civil war.

What scene in The Spark Anomaly was your favorite to write?

I don’t have a single favorite, but I enjoyed writing the Anechoic Library scene because it was an emotional turning point for my heroine. I also had a lot of fun designing the sound-canceling technology, imagining interesting ways that the system might fail, and then making use of that information in a poignant plot twist.

Do you have a motto, quote or philosophy you live by?

I’m not sure a single quote can sum up my philosophy on life, but I’ve always liked the Albert Einstein quote, “Imagination is more important than knowledge.”

This quote rings true for me as both an engineer and a novelist.

I also like the quote attributed to Lucille Ball: “If you want something done, ask a busy person to do it.”

I realize this statement is counterintuitive, but she was right. And I love working on too many projects.

Jeffrey Freedman is the author of the new book The Spark Anomaly.

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The Spark Anomaly: Hard Sci-Fi Action/Adventure (The Fisher Chronicles Book 2067)

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Interview with A.M. Hargrove, Author of One Blissful Night

What can you tell us about your new release, One Blissful Night?

My new release, One Blissful Night, is the last of the West Sisters Series. They are all stand alone novels. The series is a spin off from the West Brothers Series, which are also stand alones. In One Blissful Night, Reynolds West finds out she’s living next door to her nemesis, the boy who broke her heart in high school. The book is full of all sorts of fun, laughter, emotions, angst, steam, you name it. It checks a lot of boxes for the readers.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

I was inspired to become an author by my love for reading and writing. I’ve always loved to write, but my career path took a completely different direction. After my company was bought out by another, I received a severance package, which allowed me to finally fulfill my dream of writing.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

Top 5 list would include JR Wards Black Dagger Brotherhood series and to choose between those would be any that have Visious as the MC. Then Karen Marie Moning’s Fever Series. All 5 of them. I can’t choose. Sorry. The Wall of Winnipeg by Marianna Zapata and lastly Vicious by LJ Shen. I must have a love for all things V. 😛

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask?

If I had a literary talk show, my first guest would be JR Ward. Her writing is brilliant so I’d want to know how she came up with the idea for her BDB series. Curious minds and all.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

My favorite thing about writing is I can create anything I want and build a world that’s completely my own. It’s so much fun and thrilling to me I absolutely love it. I get invested in my characters and hate to say goodbye, which is to say I have difficulty ending my books.

What is a typical day like for you?

My typical day is after I’m up I do the worst thing possible and I check my email. However in 2020 my one resolution is to write first and then check email. I’m better at writing earlier in the day, so I’m switching things up. My new schedule will be to write from 7 to 12, and then do business. Then work out—another new resolution. My fingers are triple crossed I stick to that one. The others will be easier. Haha.

What scene in One Blissful Night was your favorite to write?

In One Blissful Night, there are some pranks the characters play on each other. I love humor in books. It’s a tension breaker so I have it every one of my books. In this one, the pranks they play were super fun to write. One of them actually occurred to my neighbor, which is why I enjoyed writing it so much. I can’t say what it is, but it involves a certain type of critter and I’ll leave it at that. 😂

Do you have a motto, quote or philosophy you live by?

My philosophy is to never give up. If something doesn’t work, keep trying. There are hundreds of success stories from people who tried to do many different things. They didn’t succeed on their first attempt. For me, quitting is not an option and never has been. I’ve have some great success and some not so great. With each book I write, I learn something new and hope to continue on this path.

A.M. Hargrove is the author of the new book One Blissful Night.

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One Blissful Night: A Stand Alone, Second Chance, Enemies To Lovers Romance (A West Sisters Novel)

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Interview with Gwen Rivers, Author of Savior’s Spell

What can you tell us about your new release, Savior’s Spell?

It’s your basic half fae orphan bent on revenge and crossing paths with a werewolf pack who help her find her destiny kind of story. There’s magic, drama, humor, relatable characters in denial and going through hell. All the essentials of a first book in a new urban fantasy series.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

I wouldn’t say I was inspired to become an author. I’ve always been a storyteller. My Nan used to call it lying, but it was storytelling, lol. It’s just what I am. Writing those stories down was just the next logical step.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

I’m going to cheat and say best series because picking just 5 books would involve pro-con lists, spreadsheets and all sorts of other data and you probably still wouldn’t get an answer out of me. Anne Bishop’s Black Jewels series and Diana Gabadon’s Outlander series for sure. Kresley Cole’s Immortal After Dark and Patricia Briggs Mercy-verse. The first two books of Sarah J Maas’s A Court of Thorns and Roses series would be number 5. I gravitate to books that involve vivid world building, magic and forever sorts of relationships.

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask?

This is one of those questions that makes me want to gouge out my own eyes with a rusty spork, lol. My anxiety would eat me from the inside out. All my focus would be on myself and not doing something stupid.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

I have the best job in the world. I love it all.

What is a typical day like for you?

Get up, let the dogs out, make coffee. Get my boys to school, try to get some words down. Afternoons are for phone calls, emails and errands. Walk the dogs, we typically do 3 miles a day. Do yoga. Aim for some more words on the page, though that doesn’t always happen. Read until bed. There’s usually food in there somewhere. I am very lucky to be living this life.

What scene in Savior’s Spell was your favorite to write?

Emma and Liam’s first meeting. It was one of those scenes that was very vivid in my mind. The rooftop, the rain, the magic. A moment of connection that is the softest whisper of destiny.

Do you have a motto, quote or philosophy you live by?

You can’t win if you don’t play.

Gwen Rivers is the author of the new book Savior’s Spell.

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Savior's Spell: A fae and fur urban fantasy (Spellcaster Series Book 1)

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Interview with Anya Mora, Author of Tuesday’s Child

What can you tell us about your new release, Tuesday’s Child?

Tuesday’s Child is a psychological suspense — lots of twists and surprises. However, what sets it apart is the main character, Emery. As a wife and mother she tells us the story of the unraveling of her family – and her desperate desire to piece it back together. Her daughter has been murdered and her newly adopted son is the prime suspect.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

I am moved by stories of complicated families and broken relationships. Kind of dark — but something we can all relate to on some level. As a mother myself, I began thinking about my worst nightmares, and I teased one of those out in Tuesday’s Child.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

Can I do my top 5 for this year? All time is too hard!

The Grace Year by Kim Liggett
Conviction by Denise Mina
City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert
The One by John Mars
Deep River by Karl Marlantes

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

I am a plotter and love to outline … but the part I love most is when I am deep into a scene and lose myself in the world completely. It’s the closest thing to time travel in the world.

What is a typical day like for you?

I’m a mom with six kids — my life is full! I usually get them off for the day and then take my coffee, with my springer spaniel trailing me, into my 1967 Aristocrat travel trailer where I sit down to write until they return from school!

What scene in Tuesday’s Child was your favorite to write?

There were lots of scenes that were hard to write. I grew my family by birth and older child adoption so many parts of this novel are laced with personal memories. But one of my favorites is near the end of the novel, in a flashback, when Emery is at the kitchen table with her children making costumes. The conversation they have brings happy tears to my eyes. Even though they were going through so much, their growing love for one another was central.

Do you have a motto, quote or philosophy you live by?

I love this one: Love Rewards The Brave. Life is messy, complicated, and tricky— there is no getting around that. But love rewards the brave every. single. time.

Anya Mora is the author of the new book Tuesday’s Child.

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Tuesday's Child: A gripping page turner full of twists and family secrets

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Interview with Mark Anthony, Author of Displaced

What can you tell us about your new release, Displaced?

Displaced is the first installment of the Alternate Reality series. This series is premised on total immersion virtual reality, and the main character is Eric Ryan. Eric is a former neuropsychologist who now works as a community therapist. He helps people who have suffered under the era’s sweeping technological advancements, with these people collectively known as the “displaced”. Eric falls into this category, so he harbors deep resentment towards technology. Because of this, he is quite displeased when a robot enters the counseling center for mental health services. During the course of treatment, the robot reveals a secret, and Eric decides to investigate. This decision sends him into virtual reality.

What or who inspired you to become an author?

I’m not exactly sure. I’ve tried numerous times to pinpoint what influenced my decision to write, but I can’t highlight one specific factor. I’ve always had an interest in reading and writing, so maybe that started me down this path. However, I don’t believe my lifelong interest was the tipping point. I think the change came when I was wrapping up my schooling and realized I didn’t want to pursue a career in my field (psychology), despite my intense interest. When reflecting on what else to do, I asked the question ‘what would you do if you didn’t have to work?’, hoping that would provide some guidance. My answer was that I would finally give writing a shot, because I’ve always had an interest in doing so. Then I just decided to do it. After penning the first lines to what would eventually become Displaced, I was hooked.

What’s on your top 5 list for the best books you’ve ever read?

I don’t really have favorite books or favorite authors. However, I read about one book per week, and every few months, I come across a book that really sticks out in my mind. Here are some examples of those books:

1. The Martian by Andy Weir
2. The Alice Network by Kate Quinn
3. Children of Time by Adrian Tchaikovksy
4. Fear the Sky by Steven Moss
5. Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

Say you’re the host of a literary talk show. Who would be your first guest? What would you want to ask?

My first guest would be a random debut author, because as a debut author myself, I understand the struggles of exposure! My questions would simply pertain to the author as a person and their new book.

What’s your favorite thing about writing?

The unparalleled freedom. I can literally create any scenario, include any characters, and have the characters do whatever I come up with. That’s a tremendous amount of power, but this also comes with tremendous amount of responsibility. In the end, I have to account for whatever occurs in the book. But I have always been the type who enjoys succeeding or failing on their own merits. That’s one of the reasons why I’m an independent author.

What is a typical day like for you?

Get up at 5:00am for work (I’m a U.S. government employee who assists victims of crime), come home about 6:00pm, eat, get some writing done. That doesn’t afford much writing time, but on the weekends, I usually cover considerable ground.

What scene in Displaced was your favorite to write?

(light spoiler ahead) My favorite scene was where Eric and Arvin drive to the Hollywood hills at night. While not much happens in this scene, it’s a moment of quiet reflection, and I enjoy those pauses in the action where the characters discuss what has happened thus far, and how that has changed them.

Do you have a motto, quote or philosophy you live by?

You only live once. Make it count!

Mark Anthony is the author of the new book Displaced.

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Displaced (Alternate Reality Book 1)

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The Story Behind Royal Playboy by Nana Malone

By Nana Malone

Royal Playboy is the first book in the Playboy Prince Duet by USA Today Bestselling Author Nana Malone.

Get all the details of this sexy new release right from the author herself in her video blog below!

Nana Malone is the author of the new book Royal Playboy.

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Royal Playboy (Playboy Prince Duet Book 1)

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Interview with Jerry Lambert, author of Minor Arcana

What can you tell us about your new release, Minor Arcana?

Minor Arcana is book two in a paranormal thriller series called The Dark Emeralds. The first book, Queen of Swords, introduced the characters and set up the mystery of a set of cursed emeralds. It was my take on the classic ghost story, but with a twist. It takes place in two timelines, 1850 and present day. I wanted to create the tension and chills of a paranormal thriller, but also with the adventure and romance of a historical fiction. I wanted the living and the dead to both have important roles and to include real events and people. When I began Minor Arcana, I wanted to show my characters a year after a night of terrifying events. My characters had been through a lot and the ones that lived needed to show that transformation. In Minor Arcana we pick up a year later, when everyone is trying to get their lives back on track after the events of Queen of Swords. It pulls from elements of witchcraft and paganism. It delves into the history of centuries old covens and into real life brothels and the indomitable women who ran them. While Minor Arcana is book two in a series, I believe that it works well as a standalone story.

What books are currently on your nightstand?

Right now, I am reading books about Lilith and ancient pagan mythology for research for my next book. Also re-reading some classic horror; Henry James’ Turn of the Screw. I am a horror fan from way back. I have always loved Stephen King and Anne Rice. In the past few years I have also developed a love for fantasy, such as Neil Gaiman. They certainly have all been an inspiration to me in my writing. So up next on my shelf is Anne Rice’s Blood Communion and Neil Gaiman’s Norse Mythology. When you’re in the process of writing or editing it is nearly impossible to read, so when you’re in between books it’s a good time to finally get caught up on reading.

What advice would you give your teenage self?

I was a voracious reader and I loved to write, but I didn’t have the confidence to pursue writing as a full-time career. When I went to college I went into other directions. I would tell my teenage self that no matter what happens, keep on track and eventually the confidence will come along with it. Keep writing no matter what else you may do. And in the times when life gets the hardest, that is when you need to work out harder and write more.

If you had an extra hour each day, how would you spend it?

I would probably spend it learning more about the publishing process and possibly get into formatting my own work. I have considered starting my own publishing business, though currently I just don’t have the time. On the other hand, I might just use that spare hour for another cup of coffee and to walk my two miniature dachshunds a little more.

What makes your world go round? Why does it bring you joy?

When I’m not working, spending time with my family, friends, and my dogs makes me happy. I love traveling with my loved ones as often as we can. We love lake house trips in the summer and traveling to Europe and Africa for fun and research. Being able to explore the world with my husband and friends is one of the greatest joys I have, and it makes anyone a more well-rounded individual. It creates an understanding of other people and other worlds that you would never otherwise be privy to.

What scene in Minor Arcana was your favorite to write?

When writing suspenseful thrillers, I love adding scenes with a bit of comic relief. I love the awkwardness of dark comedy and it throws people off a bit in a story that could otherwise be too heavy. In Minor Arcana there is a funeral scene and a cocktail party scene that were both written to break tension and set up the next surprise. Each scene involves a cast of characters that are fun to write about and are based on events and people who I know well. The Hanukkah party scene is based on a dear friend, who has since passed away, who used to have these fabulous gatherings with the most eclectic crowds. You never knew what celebrities, socialites, chefs, luminaries, Cirque du Soleil acrobats, or hairdressers you would meet there. Writing a scene that invites readers into one of those evenings was a highlight for me.

Jerry Lambert is the author of the new book Minor Arcana

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Minor Arcana (The Dark Emeralds Book 2)

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Interview with K.K. Allen, author of The Trouble With Gravity

What can you tell us about your new release, The Trouble With Gravity?

The Trouble With Gravity is a frenemies-to-lovers story starring two completely new characters in the Gravity series! So this is very much a standalone. Kai Ashley and Sebastian Chase are two people with haunting pasts who find each other at both the worst and best possible time in their lives. “If you love a strong and confident heroine and a cheeky bad boy with a heart of gold, you’ll fall nose over toes for Kai and Sebastian.” I couldn’t have said it better than BookAddict’s review did.

What books are currently on your nightstand?

For as long as I remember, I’ve had a Nicholas Sparks book on my nightstand. Even after I’ve finished reading it. He has had such a huge influence on my writing career, since college, that it just feels natural to have his books nearby. At this point, they’re more decorative than anything else. I also have a Dragon Masters book sitting there, courtesy of my eight-year-old.

What advice would you give your teenage self?

Oooh, this is a good one! Never think something is impossible. Just because you don’t know how your dreams can be accomplished, doesn’t mean they can’t be. Write the book, and figure out how to perfect and publish it later!

If you had an extra hour each day, how would you spend it?

Assuming this hour is in the middle of the day when my son is at school, I would most likely spend that time writing or distracting myself from writing by talking to my reader group, Forever Young, on Facebook (aka: my favorite place on the internet).

What makes your world go round? Why does it bring you joy?

My son recently turned eight, and every year around this time I can’t help but think about where I was then, and where I am now. From the moment I found out I was bringing a little human into this world as a single momma, my entire perspective changed. In all honesty. I grew up fast. I stopped letting life happen to me. I started reaching for goals I’d never dared to dream before. It’s safe to say that’s why I’m here today!

What scene in The Trouble With Gravity was your favorite to write?

Gahh, this entire book was so much fun to write. I cannot gush about that enough. All writers know what it feels like to be “in the zone” because that’s when the magic happens. When your heart tells the story, and your fingers fly across the keyboard. That was me during the entire process of writing this book. But my favorite scene in The Trouble With Gravity would have to be when Sebastian is in an empty theater, composing music on his piano. He doesn’t know he’s being watched by our heroine, Kai. Until this moment, Sebastian has been such an impossible tough guy, but when he’s behind the piano, he’s his most vulnerable self and that’s what Kai is getting to witness. I can still feel the rush that went through me when writing that scene, of describing the feelings moving through him during the rise and fall of the number, until the moment he sees Kai watching him. BEST EVER MOMENT!

This interview has been so much fun. Thank you so much, New In Books! And I hope y’all check out The Trouble With Gravity.

K.K. Allen is the author of the new book The Trouble With Gravity

Connect with K.K. Allen:
Author Website
 Twitter

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The Trouble With Gravity: An Enemies-to-Lovers Standalone

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